Omics Approaches and Applications in Fruit Crops Improvement

A special issue of Agronomy (ISSN 2073-4395). This special issue belongs to the section "Horticultural and Floricultural Crops".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 December 2022) | Viewed by 4191

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
College of Horticulture, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130, China
Interests: fruit development and quality formation; plant growth regulators; plant physiology and biochemistry; fruit secondary metabolism
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Guest Editor
College of Horticulture, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095, China
Interests: fruit development and ripeng process, postharvest fruit quality regulation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Fruit crop are important economic crops around the world. The global climate change and population growth bring challenges for fresh fruit production. Facing these challenges, enhancing agronomical important traits, such as yield, resistance, flavor, color, nutritional value and post-harvest fruit quality, is required for fruit crops improvement. The rapid development of multi-omics research has substantially benefited understanding a transcriptional, metabolic and protein landscape of fruit crops yield and quality formation from different omics layers. Base on the vast amount of omics data, researchers in fruit crops science are expected to identify functional genes and explore its in-depth mechanism of fruit crops yield and quality formation.  

The Special Issue focuses on application of omics technologies, such as genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics, to improve fruit crops yield and pre- and post-harvest product quality. We invite researchers to submit original research articles or reviews to the Special Issue.

Prof. Dr. Ya Luo
Prof. Dr. Haifeng Jia
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • fruit crops improvement
  • genomics
  • proteomics
  • metabolomics
  • fruit yield
  • fruit quality

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

19 pages, 9030 KiB  
Article
Metabolome and Transcriptome Analysis Reveal the Accumulation Mechanism of Carotenoids and the Causes of Color Differences in Persimmon (Diospyros kaki Thunb.) Fruits
by Lingshuai Ye, Yini Mai, Yiru Wang, Jiaying Yuan, Yujing Suo, Huawei Li, Weijuan Han, Peng Sun, Songfeng Diao and Jianmin Fu
Agronomy 2022, 12(11), 2688; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy12112688 - 29 Oct 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1695
Abstract
To explore the mechanisms of the color formation of different colored persimmon fruits, we used two different colored persimmon cultivars (yellow-peeled persimmon fruit ‘Zhongshi No.6’ and red-peeled persimmon fruit ‘Hongdenglong’) as materials to study the synthesis and accumulation of carotenoids in three stages [...] Read more.
To explore the mechanisms of the color formation of different colored persimmon fruits, we used two different colored persimmon cultivars (yellow-peeled persimmon fruit ‘Zhongshi No.6’ and red-peeled persimmon fruit ‘Hongdenglong’) as materials to study the synthesis and accumulation of carotenoids in three stages (full green, color transition, and full yellow or red) using targeted metabolomic and transcriptomic methods. A total of 14 carotenoids and 30 carotenoid lipids were identified in the peel of the two persimmon cultivars. After analysis, it was found that the total carotenoid content of the red persimmon cultivar was higher than that of the yellow persimmon cultivar. The contents of lycopene, α-carotenoid, β-carotenoid, (E/Z)-phytoene, and β-cryptoxanthin are the main reasons for the difference in total carotenoid content between the two persimmon cultivars, especially lycopene. Twelve structural genes involved in the metabolism of carotenoids were also found in this study. In comprehensive metabolome and transcriptome analysis, we found that, between the two persimmon cultivars, lycopene was the key metabolite responsible for the color difference, and PSY, LCYE, and ZDS were the key genes that regulated the differences in lycopene accumulation. The results of this study provide us with new information regarding persimmon fruit synthesis and accumulation. In addition, they also provide a theoretical foundation for improving persimmon fruit germplasm. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Omics Approaches and Applications in Fruit Crops Improvement)
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12 pages, 3035 KiB  
Article
Diversity in Acidity between Core and Pulp of Asian Pear Fruit Is Mainly Regulated by the Collaborative Activity of PH8.1 and DIC2 Genes during Fruit Development
by Shariq Mahmood Alam, Dong-Hai Liu, Muhammad Ateeq, Han Han, Huan Chen, Muhammad Abbas Khan, Yin Luo, Xue-Ling Chen and Yong-Zhong Liu
Agronomy 2022, 12(8), 1966; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy12081966 - 20 Aug 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1838
Abstract
The pear (Pyrus pyrifolia) is an important accessory fruit in which the pear core is tarter than the pear pulp. However, the reason for the acidic core and diversity in the taste of the same fruit is not clear. In this [...] Read more.
The pear (Pyrus pyrifolia) is an important accessory fruit in which the pear core is tarter than the pear pulp. However, the reason for the acidic core and diversity in the taste of the same fruit is not clear. In this study, we observed that the citrate contents were three times higher in the core than in the pulp, while the malate content decreased along with fruit development and was significantly lower in the core than in the pulp at 110 days after flowering. Overall transcript levels for citrate-malate synthesis-related genes increased more in the pear core than the pulp at early fruit development, while degradation-related genes activity was nearly similar or non-significant between the core and pulp during fruit development. The lesser malate accumulation in the pear core compared to the pulp at 110 DAF was possibly due to the reduced activity of tDT2 gene. Regarding citrate accumulation, we identified five important p-type H+-ATPase genes in pear and found that the relative expression level of the PH8.1 gene was four-fold higher in the core than in the pulp during fruit development. Moreover, the expression level of di-carboxylate carrier gene 2 (DIC2) was constantly and significantly higher in the core than in the pulp. In addition, correlation analysis signified that the transcript levels of the two genes PH8.1 and DIC2 positively and significantly correlated with the citrate contents. These results suggested that the increased and collaborative activity of PH8.1 and DIC2 played a key role in the higher citrate accumulation in the core than the pulp, thus, with the help of molecular breeding tools, the citrate contents can be optimized in pear fruit for divers and improved fruit flavoring. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Omics Approaches and Applications in Fruit Crops Improvement)
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