Special Issue "Viticulture and Plant Material as a Tool to Meet the Challenges of the Wine Industry of the Future"

A special issue of Agronomy (ISSN 2073-4395). This special issue belongs to the section "Farming Sustainability".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Carlos Miranda
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Agronomy, Biotechnology and Food Science, Universidad Pública de Navarra, 31006 Pamplona, Spain
Interests: modeling; plant physiology; statistical analysis; genetic diversity; food chemistry; irrigation; plant biology; predictive modeling; plant breeding
Dr. Jorge Urrestarazu
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Agronomy, Biotechnology and Food Science, Universidad Pública de Navarra, 31006 Pamplona, Spain
Interests: agricultural aciences; fruit tree; genetic diversity; quantitative genetics

Special Issue Information

Dear colleagues,

Viticulture is facing a number of key challenges. The impacts of climate change are already a reality which may be beneficial or not depending on the region. These impacts are bound to increase and potentially affect the competitiveness of vineyards and their geographical distribution. Even more pressures arise as environmental and societal burdens encourage farmers to adopt more sustainable methodologies but still maintain high quality products. To prepare for the future, viticulture is viticulture is adapting through a range of strategies, including management practices and changes involving establishment. Management practices might not always be sufficient to cope with increasingly harsher environmental and regulatory conditions, especially in the medium and long term. Additional strategies are needed, among which the choice of superior plant material, resilient to climate, environmental and societal challenges while being able to deliver desired wine quality and styles, plays a major role.

This Special Issue of Agronomy will focus on the role of the plant material as a tool to meet the challenges of the wine industry of the future. Research papers, communications, and review articles are all welcome. In particular, we encourage contributions on, but not limited to, the following topics: scion (varieties or clones) and rootstock comparisons and evaluations, prospection and identification of old cultivars, methods and principles for producing high quality planting material, and protocols for nursery management.

Dr. Carlos Miranda
Dr. Jorge Urrestarazu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Agronomy is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • grapevine
  • Vitis vinifera
  • plant production
  • vineyard management
  • adapted cultivars and rootstocks
  • germplasm
  • nursery
  • tolerant and resistant plant material

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
New Insight into the Identity of Italian Grapevine Varieties: The Case Study of Calabrian Germplasm
Agronomy 2021, 11(8), 1538; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy11081538 - 31 Jul 2021
Viewed by 398
Abstract
Calabria is a region located in Southern Italy and it is characterized by a long tradition of viticulture practices and favorable pedoclimatic conditions for grapevine cultivation. Nevertheless, less than 2% of cultivated land is dedicated to grapevine growing in Calabria. The characterization of [...] Read more.
Calabria is a region located in Southern Italy and it is characterized by a long tradition of viticulture practices and favorable pedoclimatic conditions for grapevine cultivation. Nevertheless, less than 2% of cultivated land is dedicated to grapevine growing in Calabria. The characterization of local grapevine accessions is crucial to valorize the local and peculiar Italian products and boost the Calabrian winemaking sector. With this purpose, we performed a deep characterization of two widespread Calabrian grapevine varieties—Magliocco Dolce and Brettio Nero, of which very little is known. In particular, a genetic and morphological analysis, a berry physico-chemical and polyphenolic compositions assessment, and oenological evaluation of monovarietal wines were carried out. Our results allowed us to demonstrate that Magliocco Dolce and Brettio Nero are unique and distinct varieties with peculiar morphological and chemical characteristics and show the suitability of these two varieties in high-quality wine production. Moreover, the obtained molecular profiles will be useful for authentication and traceability purposes. Full article
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Article
Rootstock Genotypes Shape the Response of cv. Pinot gris to Water Deficit
Agronomy 2021, 11(1), 75; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy11010075 - 31 Dec 2020
Viewed by 721
Abstract
Understanding the physiological basis underlying the water stress responses in grapevine is becoming increasingly topical owing to the challenges that climate change will impose to grapevine agriculture. Here we used cv. Pinot gris (clone H1), grafted on a series of tolerant (1103Paulsen; P), [...] Read more.
Understanding the physiological basis underlying the water stress responses in grapevine is becoming increasingly topical owing to the challenges that climate change will impose to grapevine agriculture. Here we used cv. Pinot gris (clone H1), grafted on a series of tolerant (1103Paulsen; P), sensitive (SO4) and recently selected (Georgikon28; G28, Georgikon121; G121, Zamor17; Z17) rootstocks. Plants were either subjected to reduced water availability (WS) or maintained at pot capacity (WW). Photosynthetic (light response curves), stomatal and in vivo gas exchange analysis were carried out as well as dynamics of daily water use (WU), leaf area accumulation with affordable RGB imaging pipelines and leaf water potential. Significant genotypic variation was recorded between rootstocks for most of the traits analyzed under optimal conditions with P and SO4 showing a more vigorous growth, higher CO2 assimilation rate, stomatal conductance and stomatal density per unit of leaf area than G28, G121, Z17 (p < 0.001). Under WS, rootstocks induced different water stress response in Pinot gris, with G28 and G121 showing a higher sensitivity of water use to reduced water availability (WS) (p = 0.021) and no variation for midday leaf water potential until severe WS. P, Z17 and to some extent SO4 induced a pronounced near-anisohydric response with a general WU maintenance followed by reduction in leaf water potential even at high levels of soil water content. In addition, G28 and G121 showed a less marked slope in the linear relationship between daily water use and VPD (p = 0.008) suggesting elevated sensitivity of transpiration to evaporative demand. This led to an insensitivity for total dry weight biomass of G28 and G121 under WS conditions (p < 0.001). This work provides: (i) an in-depth analysis for a series of preferable traits under WS in Pinot gris; (ii) a characterization of Pinot gris × rootstock interaction and a series of desirable traits under WS induced by several rootstocks; (iii) the potential benefit for the use a series of affordable methods (e.g., RGB imaging) to easily detect dynamic changes in biomass in grapevine and quickly phenotype genotypes with superior responses under WS. In conclusion, the near-isohydric and conservative behavior observed for G28 and G121 coupled with their low vigor suggest them as potential Pinot gris rootstock candidates for sustaining grapevine productivity in shallow soils likely to develop terminal stress conditions. Full article
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Article
Study of Wine Producers’ Marketing Communication in Extreme Territories–Application of the AGIL Scheme to Wineries’ Website Features
Agronomy 2020, 10(5), 721; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10050721 - 18 May 2020
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1165
Abstract
This study measures the communication ability of wineries in two extreme territories of Southern Italy, Mount Etna and the island of Pantelleria. The evaluation of four dimensions of web communication was carried out by the AGIL Scheme (i.e., adaptation, goal-attainment, integration, latent pattern [...] Read more.
This study measures the communication ability of wineries in two extreme territories of Southern Italy, Mount Etna and the island of Pantelleria. The evaluation of four dimensions of web communication was carried out by the AGIL Scheme (i.e., adaptation, goal-attainment, integration, latent pattern maintenance). The study provides a generalizable model to be applied in other similar studies. Additionally, focus groups of experts were carried out. The method proved to be suitable to measure the communication effectiveness of wineries through websites. Extreme territories may add value to the wine, regardless of the brand. The heroic wines may become the symbol of these territories, helping environmentally safeguard and contrast territory abandonment by rural communities. The findings highlight that effective communication of heroic viticulture may be used to reposition these wines and increase their competitive advantage in foreign markets. The study generates new ideas for reflection on new types of web communication. Full article
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