Special Issue "Open Innovation in Micro, Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises"

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. João Leitão
Website SciProfiles
Guest Editor
NECE—Research Center in Business Sciences, University of Beira Interior (UBI), 6201-001 Covilhã, Portugal; CEG-IST, University of Lisbon, Lisbon, Portugal
Interests: entrepreneurship; innovation; organizational economics; public policy; regional policy
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Léo-Paul Dana
Website
Guest Editor
Montpellier Business School, 34080 Montpellier, France
Interests: entrepreneurship; indigenous entrepreneurship; collaborative entrepreneurship

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Research defines coopetition as a mix of cooperation and competition among firms oriented towards producing innovation and generating net value added or economic benefit. The importance of studying the determinants of firms’ innovative behavior, based on those coopetition relationships, has warranted increasing attention by scholars. However, the role played by micro, small and medium-sized enterprises in this process has been neglected, even as research on economic geography, clusters, entrepreneurship and innovation has become preeminent. This represents an opportunity for scholars, policy makers, entrepreneurs and practitioners to discuss the importance of micro, small and medium-sized enterprises in determining the innovative behavior of government, industry, higher education institutions (HEIs) and citizens in environments that mix competition and cooperation.

Despite the importance of the institutional and networks approaches explored in the literature, much remains unknown regarding the role played by the referred different types of enterprises in determining innovative and economic performance. Another gap found in the literature is concerning entrepreneurial and open innovative ecosystems. There is an increasing literature suggesting reasons behind ecosystems emergence, but it fails to examine in detail the exact mechanisms behind it, namely, the role played by endogenous production factors (for example, human capital, social or relational capital, organizational capital and knowledge), using an organizational economics approach. This gap may be addressed by linking, for example, coopetition, innovative behaviour, clusters or industrial districts. If agglomeration improves the quality of the match between government, firms, HEIs, and citizens, then clusters will ensure enduring productivity and sustainable competitive advantages.

Prof. Dr. João Leitão
Prof. Léo-Paul Dana
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Open Innovation: Technology, Market, and Complexity is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Coopetition
  • Clusters
  • Industrial districts
  • Innovation
  • Micro firms
  • Open innovation
  • Performance
  • SMEs

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Firm Constraints on the Link between Proactive Innovation, Open Innovation and Firm Performance
J. Open Innov. Technol. Mark. Complex. 2019, 5(4), 88; https://doi.org/10.3390/joitmc5040088 - 23 Oct 2019
Abstract
This study aims to examine the impacts of firm constraints and proactive innovation on firm performance, using a sample of 3504 small and medium enterprises (SMEs) in Vietnam from 2011–2015. Our findings suggest that technological innovations in general are beneficial to firm performance, [...] Read more.
This study aims to examine the impacts of firm constraints and proactive innovation on firm performance, using a sample of 3504 small and medium enterprises (SMEs) in Vietnam from 2011–2015. Our findings suggest that technological innovations in general are beneficial to firm performance, increasing firm sales and profits. Further filtering innovations into two categories of proactive and reactive ones, we find that reactive innovation negatively affects firm performance, consistent with the view that proactive entrepreneurial behavior is a highly sought-after characteristic or a valuable resource for a firm as specified in resources-based theory. Finally, our result implies that if firms have low constraint or have sufficient resources, proactive strategies should be the choice if firms seek to improve their performance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Open Innovation in Micro, Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises)
Open AccessArticle
Open Innovation in SMEs: Potential and Realized Absorptive Capacity for Interorganizational Learning in Dyad Collaborations with Academia
J. Open Innov. Technol. Mark. Complex. 2019, 5(3), 72; https://doi.org/10.3390/joitmc5030072 - 19 Sep 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Due to a variety of barriers to develop innovation, small and medium enterprises (SMEs) find it necessary to collaborate with external sources of knowledge. The current study analyses the collaboration between SMEs and academia over an open innovation setting in Mexico. An absorptive [...] Read more.
Due to a variety of barriers to develop innovation, small and medium enterprises (SMEs) find it necessary to collaborate with external sources of knowledge. The current study analyses the collaboration between SMEs and academia over an open innovation setting in Mexico. An absorptive capacity (ACAP) approach has been applied to understanding the process of developing new knowledge for achieving innovation. A two-part questionnaire was developed with the aim of assessing the ACAP of a new joint research unit. Data was collected from a local group of SMEs that collaborated as dyads with academia supported by a government program of innovation in Mexico. The result shows that there was a moderate potential and realized ACAP in the sample; these results are mutually related with both parts of the questionnaire which supports our findings. In conclusion, exploitation of new knowledge is a complex dimension for creating value from collaboration, which makes the outcome difficult to measure using traditional means. It can be argued that exploiting new knowledge for innovation is an iterative process of learning when exploring new sources of knowledge from academia. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Open Innovation in Micro, Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises)
Open AccessArticle
Innovation Strategy in Small and Medium Sized Enterprises (SMEs) in the Context of Growth and Recession Indicators
J. Open Innov. Technol. Mark. Complex. 2019, 5(2), 32; https://doi.org/10.3390/joitmc5020032 - 12 Jun 2019
Cited by 3
Abstract
The implementation of innovation strategies in SMEs is subjected to changes in the economic cycle. The reliability of economic trend indicators varies according to economic trends. The author deals with the relationship between selected business cycle survey indicators and time periods that correspond [...] Read more.
The implementation of innovation strategies in SMEs is subjected to changes in the economic cycle. The reliability of economic trend indicators varies according to economic trends. The author deals with the relationship between selected business cycle survey indicators and time periods that correspond to the different phases of the economic cycle between the years 2003–2017. The aim of the article is to find out whether selected business cycle surveys indicators are equally reliable across the economic cycle. To solve the problem, first, the consensus of a selected business cycle surveys indicator and the performance of the mechanical engineering industry were evaluated, and then, the results were put into the context of the time period and tested with nonparametric ANOVA. The results show that the selected indicator was more reliable in periods of growth and less reliable in downturns, which is a signal for SMEs as to how to interpret the business cycle surveys. The use of future development assessments provides important information for businesses that make investment decisions and help them think over funding for innovation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Open Innovation in Micro, Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises)
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Open AccessArticle
Sustaining Innovation: Creativity among Employees of Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises and Students in Higher Education Institutions in Brunei Darussalam
J. Open Innov. Technol. Mark. Complex. 2019, 5(2), 25; https://doi.org/10.3390/joitmc5020025 - 07 May 2019
Cited by 3
Abstract
This paper compares creativity experiences and perceptions among employees of small and medium-sized enterprises (SME) and students in higher education institutions (HEI) in Brunei Darussalam. The study was conducted through interactions and surveys to assess (i) understanding and practice of creative tools and [...] Read more.
This paper compares creativity experiences and perceptions among employees of small and medium-sized enterprises (SME) and students in higher education institutions (HEI) in Brunei Darussalam. The study was conducted through interactions and surveys to assess (i) understanding and practice of creative tools and techniques; (ii) creativity performance in teams and individuals and (iii) perception of creativity among 39 employees in SME and 68 students from HEI. Statistical analysis was carried out using Pearson’s chi-square test for goodness of fit and Cramer’s V test to estimate strength tests for correlation. The findings indicate a majority in both groups have not received prior instruction in creativity and that employees of SMEs have less interest in receiving creative instructions. There is consensus among both groups that group work will result in greater creative performance. Ambiguity of customer needs or requirement was a factor most often cited to impede creative performance of teams in SME. Results from this study were used to make recommendations to improve practice and learning creativity in SME and HEI. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Open Innovation in Micro, Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises)
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