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Int. Med. Educ., Volume 3, Issue 3 (September 2024) – 5 articles

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18 pages, 492 KiB  
Article
Design and Assessment of a Multidisciplinary Training Programme on Child Abuse and Child Protection for Medical Students Comprising Coursework and a Seminar
by Edem Magdalene Afua Tette, Ebenezer V. Badoe, Nyonuku A. Baddoo, Henry J. O. Lawson, Samuel Pie, Edmund T. Nartey and Margaret Y. Lartey
Int. Med. Educ. 2024, 3(3), 239-256; https://doi.org/10.3390/ime3030020 - 27 Jun 2024
Viewed by 246
Abstract
Child abuse affects millions of children globally. Comprehensive training is essential to promote its recognition and trigger appropriate responses to prevent missed opportunities for intervention. We describe a child abuse and child protection training programme for University of Ghana Medical School students and [...] Read more.
Child abuse affects millions of children globally. Comprehensive training is essential to promote its recognition and trigger appropriate responses to prevent missed opportunities for intervention. We describe a child abuse and child protection training programme for University of Ghana Medical School students and the cross-sectional survey of student assessment at the end. The programme comprised a lectures, dissertations, community surveys, case reports, public health advocacy topics, and poster designs. These were carried out as part of regular coursework in community health, using individual and group—methods. It culminated in a one-day whole-class seminar after their final examinations with completion and analyses of self-administered student assessment questionnaires. The seminar comprised nineteen 10-min oral presentations, twelve poster presentations on community surveys and dissertations, nine educative posters, three leaflets and a question-and-answer session. The training involved 208 students, and 126 completed the questionnaires. The majority of the students had good knowledge (80–100%). They correctly identified the types (91%), risk factors (87%), and gained clarity in selected areas. Added benefits were awards, a book of abstracts and summaries, policy brief and continuous professional development points for doctors. This training programme exemplifies the establishment of medical education in the context of the needs of the population to—be served. Full article
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10 pages, 215 KiB  
Article
Exploring Progression: A Case Study on Student Performance Using the National Clinical Assessment Tool in Emergency Medicine
by Xiaomei Song and Derek Schaller
Int. Med. Educ. 2024, 3(3), 229-238; https://doi.org/10.3390/ime3030019 - 27 Jun 2024
Viewed by 150
Abstract
Entrustable Professional Activities-based (EPAs-based) assessments gained much interest among clinical educators, especially after the AAMC publication in 2014. In 2016, a standardized tool, the National Clinical Assessment Tool for Medical Students in Emergency Medicine (NCAT-EM), was developed at a national conference. Since 2018, [...] Read more.
Entrustable Professional Activities-based (EPAs-based) assessments gained much interest among clinical educators, especially after the AAMC publication in 2014. In 2016, a standardized tool, the National Clinical Assessment Tool for Medical Students in Emergency Medicine (NCAT-EM), was developed at a national conference. Since 2018, the modified NCAT-EM has been used at Central Michigan University School of Medicine at shift ends, midway through clerkships, and upon completion of the clerkship. This empirical study analyzed student performance progression in order to enhance school assessment practices and inform future action plans. Descriptive and inferential statistics were calculated. During the 2021–2022 academic year, 89 faculty and residents assessed 97 students on 238 submission days. The students generally received multiple sets of daily shift feedback. Two domains, note writing and practice-based learning, showed significant differences between the mid-clerkship formative and summative scoring. Professionalism issues were evident with this cohort of students. The study provides some validity evidence regarding student performance and progression within the context. The NCAT-EM provides values and benefits as evidenced by the substantial volume of assessor feedback during its fourth year of implementation. This study provides directions for future action plans for faculty training, promising continuous improvement in emergency medicine assessment practices. Full article
17 pages, 558 KiB  
Article
Validity Evidence for Using the Situational Motivation Scale to Assess Pre-Clerkship Medical Student Motivation
by Brian Wasicek and Douglas McHugh
Int. Med. Educ. 2024, 3(3), 212-228; https://doi.org/10.3390/ime3030018 - 26 Jun 2024
Viewed by 584
Abstract
Motivation is essential in education, with highly motivated learners engaging more deeply with content and more ably transferring knowledge to new contexts. However, the validity of scales to measure motivation has been underexplored in pre-clerkship medical education. This study evaluates the validity of [...] Read more.
Motivation is essential in education, with highly motivated learners engaging more deeply with content and more ably transferring knowledge to new contexts. However, the validity of scales to measure motivation has been underexplored in pre-clerkship medical education. This study evaluates the validity of the Situational Motivation Scale (SIMS) for measuring motivation among pre-clerkship medical students in post-situational and short-term contexts. Using a sample of n = 156 students from the Frank H. Netter MD School of Medicine at Quinnipiac University, SIMS was tested to construct validity, with attention paid to content, response process, internal structure, relationships to other variables, and consequences of use evidence. Small modifications from present to past tense in English were made for clarity following focus-group feedback, and content validity was ensured via expert consultation. The SIMS demonstrated strong internal consistency, with a satisfactory Cronbach’s alpha for all subscales and anticipated patterns of correlations. The factor analysis confirmed appropriate factor loadings, with a stronger model fit for the short-term context, and no observed adverse effects on student engagement. These findings support the robustness of the SIMS in capturing intrinsic, extrinsic, and amotivation in pre-clerkship medical students, highlighting its applicability for short-term and situational motivational assessment. Full article
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22 pages, 762 KiB  
Article
Impact of Global Health Scholarship Programs in the Faculty of Medicine at Mbarara University of Science and Technology
by Jonans Tusiimire, Miriam Josephine Nakiwala, Brian Turigye, Daphine Ansiimire, Annet Kembabazi, Stephen Asiimwe and Joseph Ngonzi
Int. Med. Educ. 2024, 3(3), 190-211; https://doi.org/10.3390/ime3030017 - 24 Jun 2024
Viewed by 334
Abstract
In recognition of the critical role of residency programs in narrowing healthcare inequalities, Global Health scholarships were introduced at Mbarara University of Science and Technology (MUST) in 2011. Since then, at least 154 postgraduate students in priority programs have benefited. We conducted an [...] Read more.
In recognition of the critical role of residency programs in narrowing healthcare inequalities, Global Health scholarships were introduced at Mbarara University of Science and Technology (MUST) in 2011. Since then, at least 154 postgraduate students in priority programs have benefited. We conducted an online cross-sectional survey to examine how the scholarships and beneficiaries have impacted MUST and the community. Fifty (50) beneficiaries, representing 32.5%, responded, of whom 36 (72%) were alumni. Most respondents were males (n = 30; 60%) pursing Master of Medicine (n = 29; 58%) or Master of Nursing Science (n = 20; 40%) programs. The scholarship schemes included First Mile (n = 29; 58%), Kayanja (n = 12; 24%), Paiko (n = 5; 10%) and Seed (n = 4; 8%). The majority of the scholarships supported both tuition and research fees (n = 41; 82%), the rest being partial. Career advancement was undertaken by eight (16%) of the scholars in the form of fellowships (n = 3; 6%), other masters (n = 3; 6%) and PhDs (n = 3; 6%), with some students having attained a combination of these. All scholars belonged to at least one health professional association. Over 88% (n = 32) of the alumni and 28% (n = 4) of the students were employed. The majority of those employed were in the public sector (n = 24; 66.7%), mainly the health sector (n = 18; 50%), academia (n = 14; 38.9) or both (n = 4; 11.1%). There was a high impact on health care provision, undergraduate training and research carried out by the scholars both during training and post-graduation. High levels of career satisfaction, scholarship impact and academic program relevance were reported. The findings provide insights on how low-fund specialty scholarships can have a far-reaching impact on local training, health care and research in low- and middle-income countries. Full article
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10 pages, 10898 KiB  
Brief Report
Simulation-Based Medical Education: 3D Printing and the Seldinger Technique
by David Hyndman and Douglas McHugh
Int. Med. Educ. 2024, 3(3), 180-189; https://doi.org/10.3390/ime3030016 - 24 Jun 2024
Viewed by 321
Abstract
Three-dimensional (3D)-printed models with high anatomic fidelity are an increasingly viable tool in simulation-based medical education. One advantage of 3D models is they provide enhanced tactile and spatial understanding of complex anatomy to develop technical skills used in minimally invasive procedures. We propose [...] Read more.
Three-dimensional (3D)-printed models with high anatomic fidelity are an increasingly viable tool in simulation-based medical education. One advantage of 3D models is they provide enhanced tactile and spatial understanding of complex anatomy to develop technical skills used in minimally invasive procedures. We propose that 3D anatomical models can improve the development of interventional radiology vascular access skills—first described in the 1950s as the Seldinger technique—for pre-clerkship medical students. The early adoption of 3D-printed technology in pre-clinical medical education can lead to improved student engagement and satisfaction when learning procedural techniques. This study involved creating a 3D model of the upper limb vasculature from an anonymized Computed tomography (CT) angiogram, using it as a medical education tool for 31 pre-clinical medical students practicing the Seldinger Technique on a prefabricated venipuncture upper limb, and assessing student satisfaction with this form of learning. Overall, attendees responded positively to the incorporation of the 3D model in medical education to improve their anatomic understanding and application of the Seldinger technique. These results indicate that the use of 3D models in simulation-based medical education can provide benefits in acquiring technical skills and the potential to decrease training costs without harming a patient. Full article
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