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Dermato, Volume 4, Issue 3 (September 2024) – 2 articles

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7 pages, 768 KiB  
Brief Report
Assessment of Micellar Water pH and Product Claims
by Dēna Skadiņa, Ināra Nokalna and Alise Balcere
Dermato 2024, 4(3), 79-85; https://doi.org/10.3390/dermato4030009 (registering DOI) - 11 Jul 2024
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Abstract
Micellar waters are widely used skincare cleansing products. It is commonly considered that micellar waters do not need to be rinsed off. Products left on the skin can affect its pH, which typically ranges from 4.1 to 5.8. and plays a vital role [...] Read more.
Micellar waters are widely used skincare cleansing products. It is commonly considered that micellar waters do not need to be rinsed off. Products left on the skin can affect its pH, which typically ranges from 4.1 to 5.8. and plays a vital role in maintaining the integrity of the skin barrier. Our objective was to evaluate the pH of micellar waters and investigate product claims, and differences according to target skin type. The pH of 30 samples of different micellar waters was tested. The products were categorized into groups based on target skin type. Statistical analysis was performed on both quantitative and qualitative data. In addition to descriptive statistics, the Shapiro–Wilk test, Fischer’s Exact test, and the Kruskal–Wallis test were used considering the minimal significance level of 95%. The pH of the tested micellar waters ranged from 4.25 to 7.87. Most samples, 21 (70%), claimed to have a no-rinse formula. Most products, 18 (60%), also reported some type of testing having been performed. There were no statistically significant differences in pH between target skin types but products “for all skin types” were the most likely to lack rinsing instructions. In conclusion, most micellar water samples had skin-friendly pH levels and providers should carefully consider product characteristics for patients with skin conditions. Full article
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Case Report
Rare Presentation, Critical Diagnosis: Primary Actinomycosis of the Foot
by Alexandra Maria Dorobanțu, Mihai Lupu, Liliana Gabriela Popa, Raluca Tatar, Calin Giurcaneanu, Irina Tudose and Olguta Anca Orzan
Dermato 2024, 4(3), 72-78; https://doi.org/10.3390/dermato4030008 - 4 Jul 2024
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Abstract
Actinomycosis, an uncommon granulomatous infection caused by the Actinomyces species, rarely targets as primary involvement the limb and is often linked to traumatic incidents. In this report, we present the case of a 44-year-old female who developed multiple small nodules on her left [...] Read more.
Actinomycosis, an uncommon granulomatous infection caused by the Actinomyces species, rarely targets as primary involvement the limb and is often linked to traumatic incidents. In this report, we present the case of a 44-year-old female who developed multiple small nodules on her left foot over approximately 12 months. Some nodules exhibited firmness and a violet hue, while others discharged a yellowish fluid. The patient had no significant comorbidities. Despite thorough blood paraclinical assessments, including complete blood count, serological HIV testing, and QuantiFERON-TB Gold testing, no abnormalities were detected. Bacteriological examinations and cultures of the discharge yielded negative results. Dermatoscopic examination revealed ovoid yellowish structures, with confocal microscopy highlighting granulomas. A subsequent skin biopsy confirmed characteristic changes indicative of actinomycosis. Although systemic antibiotic therapy with penicillin derivatives was initially considered, the patient’s documented allergic history to this medication class, verified through allergological testing, prompted the initiation of doxycycline treatment. Notably, significant improvement was observed at the 3-month follow-up. This case underscores the importance of reporting rare instances of actinomycosis due to its diagnostic complexity and management challenges. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue What Is Your Diagnosis?—Case Report Collection)
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