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Eng. Proc., 2023, E-Textiles 2022

E-Textiles 2022: The 4th International Conference on the Challenges, Opportunities, Innovations and Applications in Electronic Textiles

Nottingham, UK | 8–10 November 2022

Volume Editors:
Steve Beeby, University of Southampton, UK
Kai Yang, University of Southampton, UK
Russel Torah, University of Southampton, UK
Theodore Hughes-Riley, Nottingham Trent University, UK

Number of Papers: 22

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Cover Story (view full-size image): E-Textiles 2022: The 4th International Conference on the Challenges, Opportunities, Innovations and Applications in Electronic Textiles is an annual conference run by the E-Textiles Network and is [...] Read more.
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1 pages, 174 KiB  
Editorial
Statement of Peer Review
by Russel Torah, Kai Yang, Theodore Hughes-Riley and Stephen Beeby
Eng. Proc. 2023, 30(1), 21; https://doi.org/10.3390/engproc2023030021 - 29 Jun 2023
Viewed by 416
Abstract
In submitting conference proceedings to Engineering Proceedings, the volume editors of the proceedings certify to the publisher that all papers published in this volume have been subjected to peer review administered by the volume editors [...] Full article
3 pages, 182 KiB  
Editorial
Preface of the 4th International Conference on the Challenges, Opportunities, Innovations and Applications in Electronic Textiles (E-Textiles 2022)
by Steve Beeby, Kai Yang, Russel Torah, Beckie Isaia and Theodore Hughes-Riley
Eng. Proc. 2023, 30(1), 22; https://doi.org/10.3390/engproc2023030022 - 11 Jul 2023
Viewed by 555
Abstract
The 4th International Conference on the Challenges, Opportunities, Innovations and Applications in Electronic Textiles (E-Textiles 2022) was held in Nottingham (United Kingdom) on 8–10 November 2022. Full article

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5 pages, 2732 KiB  
Proceeding Paper
Optimization of Heating Performance of the Rib-Knitted Wearable Heating Pad
by Sandeep Kumar Maurya, Apurba Das and Bipin Kumar
Eng. Proc. 2023, 30(1), 1; https://doi.org/10.3390/engproc2023030001 - 19 Jan 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1068
Abstract
Textile structures such as knitting, weaving, braiding, and nonwoven can be used to produce wearable heating pads. Knitted fabric has unique properties such as stretchability, flexibility, and comfort among these textile structures. However, traditional knitted heating pads are manufactured by employing a straightforward [...] Read more.
Textile structures such as knitting, weaving, braiding, and nonwoven can be used to produce wearable heating pads. Knitted fabric has unique properties such as stretchability, flexibility, and comfort among these textile structures. However, traditional knitted heating pads are manufactured by employing a straightforward three-structure design comprised of a plain, rib, and interlock with yarn that is entirely conductive. The usage of fully conductive materials in industrial applications has been restricted primarily as a result of their more expensive price tag and higher power requirements. Herein, we reported a rib (knitting structure)-based wearable heater with localized conductive yarn. A 14-gauge V-bed knitting machine is used to prepare a localized heating pad with a slight variation in the loop length. The rib-knitted structure (R1) with the lowest loop length showed a 47.4 °C average surface temperature at 9 Volt DC power source. The laboratory-based prototype of the heating pad is also designed for alleviation of joint and muscle pain in the affected area of the body. Full article
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4 pages, 2605 KiB  
Proceeding Paper
A Screen-Printed 8 × 8 Pixel Electroluminescent Display on Fabric
by Huanghao Dai, Thomas Greig, Russel Torah and Steve Beeby
Eng. Proc. 2023, 30(1), 2; https://doi.org/10.3390/engproc2023030002 - 19 Jan 2023
Viewed by 845
Abstract
A screen-printed electroluminescent (EL) matrix display on fabric is presented. This work demonstrates the fabrication of a screen-printed multilayer display with a matrix of 8 × 8 pixels, as well as the design and construction of integrated drive electronics capable of operating the [...] Read more.
A screen-printed electroluminescent (EL) matrix display on fabric is presented. This work demonstrates the fabrication of a screen-printed multilayer display with a matrix of 8 × 8 pixels, as well as the design and construction of integrated drive electronics capable of operating the EL display and achieving good visibility. Each pixel is 1 mm × 1 mm, which is smaller than in previously reported literature. The EL matrix was successfully printed and laminated on fabric at this higher resolution, improving the visual effect and decreasing the overall display size, and reducing the impact on the flexibility and breathability of the underlying fabric. This proof-of-concept demonstrator EL display shows the potential for more complex pixel displays for e-textile and printed electronic applications, such as interactive clothing, and information displays in applications, such as the automotive field, architecture, and point of sale advertising. Full article
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4 pages, 2256 KiB  
Proceeding Paper
Measuring the Flex Life of Conductive Yarns in Narrow Fabric
by Paula Veske, Frederick Bossuyt, Filip Thielemans and Jan Vanfleteren
Eng. Proc. 2023, 30(1), 3; https://doi.org/10.3390/engproc2023030003 - 19 Jan 2023
Viewed by 752
Abstract
The current work presents a testing machine built from off-the-shelf components to test for conductive yarns’ (or textiles’) durability to repeated bending that can occur during general wear-and-tear or domestic washing procedures. The testing method is explained with an example and results, comparing [...] Read more.
The current work presents a testing machine built from off-the-shelf components to test for conductive yarns’ (or textiles’) durability to repeated bending that can occur during general wear-and-tear or domestic washing procedures. The testing method is explained with an example and results, comparing two different conductive yarns weaved into polyester-based narrow fabric. Full article
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4 pages, 459 KiB  
Proceeding Paper
Ethical Aspects of Health Sensing Applications in E-Textiles
by Sanju Ahuja and Jyoti Kumar
Eng. Proc. 2023, 30(1), 4; https://doi.org/10.3390/engproc2023030004 - 20 Jan 2023
Viewed by 768
Abstract
The role of e-textiles has been discussed widely for health sensing applications. However, the ethical aspects of health sensing e-textiles have received less attention in the literature. In this contribution, we aim to identify the ethical concerns that emerge from the collection and [...] Read more.
The role of e-textiles has been discussed widely for health sensing applications. However, the ethical aspects of health sensing e-textiles have received less attention in the literature. In this contribution, we aim to identify the ethical concerns that emerge from the collection and use of health data from e-textiles. To identify these concerns, we draw upon the literature on health wearables and m-health applications. We propose that four ethical concerns need to be accounted for in the design of e-textiles that collect health data. These are privacy, discrimination, autonomy, and harm. We discuss the need to address these ethical concerns during the design process. Full article
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5 pages, 2212 KiB  
Proceeding Paper
Simultaneous Breathing and ECG Measurements with e-Knits
by Kristel Fobelets, Christoforos Panteli and Ghena Hammour
Eng. Proc. 2023, 30(1), 5; https://doi.org/10.3390/engproc2023030005 - 20 Jan 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 956
Abstract
Simultaneous recording of breathing and heart rate signals was carried out on a healthy volunteer with a fully knitted, non-sports-type garment. Breathing was recorded using two knitted respiratory inductive plethysmography (RIP) sensors. Electrocardiogram (ECG) recordings were obtained from three knitted electrodes. The knitted [...] Read more.
Simultaneous recording of breathing and heart rate signals was carried out on a healthy volunteer with a fully knitted, non-sports-type garment. Breathing was recorded using two knitted respiratory inductive plethysmography (RIP) sensors. Electrocardiogram (ECG) recordings were obtained from three knitted electrodes. The knitted garment design was customised for the specific requirements of RIP and ECG by adapting the needle size and/or introducing knit-in-elastic in the sensor areas. RIP was read out using an in-house-developed cross-coupled complementary oscillator circuit. The ECG was recorded using the commercial OpenBCI board. The sensors produced excellent signal quality that allowed for simple signal processing to extract information on heart and breathing rates, showing good correlation between the two. Full article
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5 pages, 1012 KiB  
Proceeding Paper
Hit the Ground Running—Wearable Sensors to Measure Foot Plantar Pressure
by Niamh Saunders, Karnasooriya Ragalage Sanjaya Dinuwan Gunawardhana, Luz Alejandra Magre Colorado, Sonal Santosh Baberwal and Shirley Coyle
Eng. Proc. 2023, 30(1), 6; https://doi.org/10.3390/engproc2023030006 - 20 Jan 2023
Viewed by 1014
Abstract
Flexible pressure sensors can be used to predict possible injuries and inform the wearer about their foot posture and landing positions during both walking and running. This work focuses on designing and producing capacitive pressure sensors and integrating them into a smart insole. [...] Read more.
Flexible pressure sensors can be used to predict possible injuries and inform the wearer about their foot posture and landing positions during both walking and running. This work focuses on designing and producing capacitive pressure sensors and integrating them into a smart insole. The suitability of sensors was assessed using a mechanical test rig to measure the change of capacitance under different loads. The effects of introducing micropores into the dielectric layer using two fabrication methods were analysed. The results obtained imply that the use of micropores has the potential to increase the sensitivity and improve the response time of the sensors. Full article
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5 pages, 1238 KiB  
Proceeding Paper
Automotive Seat Occupancy Sensor Based on e-Textile Technology
by Marc Martínez-Estrada, Ignacio Gil and Raúl Fernández-García
Eng. Proc. 2023, 30(1), 7; https://doi.org/10.3390/engproc2023030007 - 20 Jan 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1481
Abstract
A woven capacitive sensor is presented as a novel automotive seat occupancy sensor. The woven capacitive sensor is developed as a response to one of the most difficult challenges that the automotive sector has faced the past few years: seat occupancy sensor false [...] Read more.
A woven capacitive sensor is presented as a novel automotive seat occupancy sensor. The woven capacitive sensor is developed as a response to one of the most difficult challenges that the automotive sector has faced the past few years: seat occupancy sensor false positives. The designed sensor demonstrates the error-free sitting detection of a person by detecting the change of the permittivity around it, providing a distinction between a person and an object with the same weight. Full article
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5 pages, 872 KiB  
Proceeding Paper
The Energy Harvesting Performance of a Flexible Triboelectric-Based Electrospun PTFE/PVDF Fibre
by Pattarinee White, Dmitry Bavykin, Mohamed Moshrefi-Torbati and Stephen Beeby
Eng. Proc. 2023, 30(1), 8; https://doi.org/10.3390/engproc2023030008 - 20 Jan 2023
Viewed by 1098
Abstract
A triboelectric power generator/energy harvester is an attractive option for mechanical energy harvesting for smart, wearable applications. This paper reports on the fabrication and evaluation of the energy harvesting performance of Polytetrafluoroethylene/Polyvinylidene Fluoride (PTFE/PVDF) fibre prepared using a one-step electrospinning technique. Different concentrations [...] Read more.
A triboelectric power generator/energy harvester is an attractive option for mechanical energy harvesting for smart, wearable applications. This paper reports on the fabrication and evaluation of the energy harvesting performance of Polytetrafluoroethylene/Polyvinylidene Fluoride (PTFE/PVDF) fibre prepared using a one-step electrospinning technique. Different concentrations (0, 1, 2, 3, and 4%wt.) of the 1 μm PTFE powder in the electrospun PVDF fibre were investigated. The electrospun fibre was assembled into a nonwoven fabric mat and tested in the vertical contact separation triboelectric mode by constructing a sandwich structure with electrodes in a book-shaped assembly. The voltage output from the cyclical compressive test for fibres with 4%wt. PTFE in PVDF was five times greater than it was for the 100% PVDF electrospun fibres. The influence of adding nylon fabric as a triboelectric donor material within the assembly was explored. The output of the 4%wt. PTFE/PVDF sample was then tested with and without nylon fabric at different frequencies (3–12 Hz). The results show a further 80% increase in the output voltage with the additional nylon fabric included, and the harvester was able to illuminate up to 95 LEDs. Full article
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5 pages, 1406 KiB  
Proceeding Paper
Second Skins: Exploring the Challenges and Opportunities for Designing Adaptable Garments Using E-Textile
by Malou Beemer, Christian Dils and Troy Nachtigall
Eng. Proc. 2023, 30(1), 9; https://doi.org/10.3390/engproc2023030009 - 20 Jan 2023
Viewed by 1102
Abstract
The process of making adaptive and responsive wearables on the scale of the body has often been a process where designers use off-the-shelf parts or hand-crafted electronics to fabricate garments. However, recent research has shown the importance of emergence in the process of [...] Read more.
The process of making adaptive and responsive wearables on the scale of the body has often been a process where designers use off-the-shelf parts or hand-crafted electronics to fabricate garments. However, recent research has shown the importance of emergence in the process of making. Second Skins is a multistakeholder exploration into the creation of those garments where the designers and engineers work together throughout the design process so that opportunities and challenges emerge with all stakeholders present in the process. This research serves as a case study into the creation of adaptive caring garments for sustainable wardrobes from a multistakeholder design team. The team created a garment that can customize the colors, patterns, structures, and other properties dynamically. A reflection on the multi-stakeholder process unpacks the process to explore the challenges and opportunities in adaptable e-textiles. Full article
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4 pages, 1552 KiB  
Proceeding Paper
Development of a Knitted Strain Sensor for Health Monitoring Applications
by Beyza Bozali, Sepideh Ghodrat and Kaspar M. B. Jansen
Eng. Proc. 2023, 30(1), 10; https://doi.org/10.3390/engproc2023030010 - 29 Jan 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1030
Abstract
As an emerging technology, smart textiles have attracted attention for rehabilitation purposes to monitor heart rate, blood pressure, breathing rate, body posture and limb movements. Compared with traditional sensors, knitted sensors constructed from conductive yarns are breathable, stretchable and washable, and therefore, provide [...] Read more.
As an emerging technology, smart textiles have attracted attention for rehabilitation purposes to monitor heart rate, blood pressure, breathing rate, body posture and limb movements. Compared with traditional sensors, knitted sensors constructed from conductive yarns are breathable, stretchable and washable, and therefore, provide more comfort to the body and can be used in everyday life. In this study, knitted strain sensors were produced that are linear with up to 40% strain, sensitivity of 1.19 and hysteresis of 1.2% in absolute values, and hysteresis of 0.03 when scaled to the working range of 40%. The developed sensor was integrated into a wearable wrist-glove system for finger and wrist monitoring. The results show that the wearable was able to detect different finger angles and positions of the wrist. Full article
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4 pages, 1730 KiB  
Proceeding Paper
Smart Sock Feasibility Study
by Lucie Hernandez
Eng. Proc. 2023, 30(1), 11; https://doi.org/10.3390/engproc2023030011 - 29 Jan 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 996
Abstract
Touch Craft Ltd completed a feasibility study to understand the market position, technologies and user requirement for a smart sock sensing system designed to help monitor foot problems for people living with diabetes. The proposed system would involve a non-invasive, low-cost approach to [...] Read more.
Touch Craft Ltd completed a feasibility study to understand the market position, technologies and user requirement for a smart sock sensing system designed to help monitor foot problems for people living with diabetes. The proposed system would involve a non-invasive, low-cost approach to gathering and measuring skin and foot data considering parameters such as pressure, temperature, and activity levels. The smart sock sensing system would enable both clinicians and patients to have a broader view of foot health and assist in improving the quality of life for patients and their carers. Full article
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4 pages, 2478 KiB  
Proceeding Paper
Effect of Bandage Materials on Epidermal Antenna
by Irfan Ullah, Mahmoud Wagih, Abiodun Komolafe and Steve P. Beeby
Eng. Proc. 2023, 30(1), 12; https://doi.org/10.3390/engproc2023030012 - 29 Jan 2023
Viewed by 965
Abstract
This study explores the effect of different types of bandages on the performance of an epidermal antenna. Three identical dipole antennas are designed on three different types of bandages, and the measured reflection coefficients, S11, show that the antennas resonate at [...] Read more.
This study explores the effect of different types of bandages on the performance of an epidermal antenna. Three identical dipole antennas are designed on three different types of bandages, and the measured reflection coefficients, S11, show that the antennas resonate at the same frequency despite the different types of fabric bandages. However, the antennas resonance frequency shifts to a lower frequency when the antennas are mounted on the body. The transmission coefficient, S21, over a 60 cm link with a standard RFID antenna is at least −30 dB, and −34 dB in free space and on the body, respectively, demonstrating that the antenna is suitable for communication and wireless RF power transfer in wearable applications. Full article
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5 pages, 5776 KiB  
Proceeding Paper
Novel Strain Sensor in Weft-Knitted Textile for Triggering of Functional Electrical Stimulation
by Bahareh Abtahi, Mareen Warncke, Hans Winger, Carmen Sachse, Eric Häntzsche, Andreas Nocke and Chokri Cherif
Eng. Proc. 2023, 30(1), 13; https://doi.org/10.3390/engproc2023030013 - 31 Jan 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1155
Abstract
Functional electrical stimulation (FES) aims to improve the gait pattern in case of foot drop of people suffering chronic diseases, e.g., multiple sclerosis. The fibular nerve can be stimulated by electrical impulses sent through electrodes on the skin, which leads to the contraction [...] Read more.
Functional electrical stimulation (FES) aims to improve the gait pattern in case of foot drop of people suffering chronic diseases, e.g., multiple sclerosis. The fibular nerve can be stimulated by electrical impulses sent through electrodes on the skin, which leads to the contraction of the corresponding muscles. One major disadvantage of commercial FES devices is their bulky design. The paper presents an alternative approach of weft-knitted strain sensors that are directly integrated into the knee area of a functional legging suitable for daily use. To initiate electrical impulses for FES at the right time, the textile strain sensors are used as soft triggers. Full article
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5 pages, 6101 KiB  
Proceeding Paper
Developing High-Resolution Thin-Film Microcircuits on Textiles
by Abiodun Komolafe, Michael Gakas and Steve Beeby
Eng. Proc. 2023, 30(1), 14; https://doi.org/10.3390/engproc2023030014 - 31 Jan 2023
Viewed by 794
Abstract
Scaling down the form-factor of printed electronics is one of the methods for improving the reliability of printed e-textiles. This also enhances the wearability of the printed e-textile. However, the surface roughness of textiles and the low resolution of current printing methods, such [...] Read more.
Scaling down the form-factor of printed electronics is one of the methods for improving the reliability of printed e-textiles. This also enhances the wearability of the printed e-textile. However, the surface roughness of textiles and the low resolution of current printing methods, such as screen-printing, often present significant challenges for directly realizing microcircuits on textiles that are developed for printed e-textile applications. This work reports the planarization of a polyester cotton textile with a screen-printed polyurethane (PU) smoothing interface layer to enable the micro-patterning of the textile with conductive thin films using microfabrication techniques. Thermally evaporated copper structures with features sized from 800 µm down to 10 µm are patterned on the planar textile, demonstrating a printed resolution that is otherwise difficult to achieve through screen-printing even with the aid of specialized screens. Full article
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4 pages, 3164 KiB  
Proceeding Paper
Miniature Flexible Reprogrammable Microcontroller Circuits for E-Textiles
by Tom Greig, Kai Yang and Russel Torah
Eng. Proc. 2023, 30(1), 15; https://doi.org/10.3390/engproc2023030015 - 02 Feb 2023
Viewed by 1070
Abstract
An e-textile system was developed, allowing USB reprogramming of miniature, flexible, integrated microcontroller circuits which allows for easier development of complex and configurable e-textile circuits. This prototype consisted of a series of five exposed pads on the edge of the PCB and a [...] Read more.
An e-textile system was developed, allowing USB reprogramming of miniature, flexible, integrated microcontroller circuits which allows for easier development of complex and configurable e-textile circuits. This prototype consisted of a series of five exposed pads on the edge of the PCB and a corresponding clip connector. Mounted onto the clip are a micro-USB port and necessary additional components to facilitate USB programming meaning that no additional components are required on the microcontroller board thus increasing flexibility. This system has the potential to make software development and reconfiguration of the e-textile easier while the small size and flexibility of the connector allow improved textile integration. This work provides a platform for future e-textile system development and increases the operational lifetime, thus reducing waste due to product obsolescence. Full article
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5 pages, 1619 KiB  
Proceeding Paper
Design and Test of E-Textiles for Stroke Rehabilitation
by Meijing Liu, Tyler Ward, Odina Keim, Yuanyuan Yin, Paul Taylor, John Tudor and Kai Yang
Eng. Proc. 2023, 30(1), 16; https://doi.org/10.3390/engproc2023030016 - 06 Feb 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 983
Abstract
This work presents the design and test of an e-textile based functional electrical stimulation system for post-stroke upper limb rehabilitation. The prototype was tested on five stroke survivors to assess stimulation comfort, the stimulation intensity required to achieve hand opening, and ease of [...] Read more.
This work presents the design and test of an e-textile based functional electrical stimulation system for post-stroke upper limb rehabilitation. The prototype was tested on five stroke survivors to assess stimulation comfort, the stimulation intensity required to achieve hand opening, and ease of use. Wrist extension was measured using two inertial measurement units. The wearable e-textile prototype achieved similar stimulation comfort compared to high-quality hydrogel electrodes with a score difference of between 0 and 1. The stimulation intensity to achieve full hand opening was the same for the hydrogel electrodes and the e-textiles for all five participants. A second design based on a knitted sleeve has been assessed in terms of usability. Additional new designs have been proposed to improve the usability. Full article
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5 pages, 4504 KiB  
Proceeding Paper
Wearable Preventive Pressure Ulcer System Using Embroidered Textile Electrodes
by Ghada Elbarbari, Wedian Madian, Barakat Mahmoud and Bahira Gabr
Eng. Proc. 2023, 30(1), 17; https://doi.org/10.3390/engproc2023030017 - 06 Feb 2023
Viewed by 1444
Abstract
Approximately 80 percent of patients with limited mobility experience pressure ulcers (PU). Electrical stimulation (ES) is an effective therapeutic approach for PU prevention and treatment. This study reports the design of a custom-made adaptive garment as a wearable preventive pressure ulcer system by [...] Read more.
Approximately 80 percent of patients with limited mobility experience pressure ulcers (PU). Electrical stimulation (ES) is an effective therapeutic approach for PU prevention and treatment. This study reports the design of a custom-made adaptive garment as a wearable preventive pressure ulcer system by using embroidered textile electrodes to induce electrical stimulation for the gluteal muscles. Eight electrodes were embroidered using a satin stitch on a 100% cotton knitted fabric, only the bobbin was loaded with conductive threads, and cotton/polyester thread was used for the top stitch. An ES-induced protocol of 1:4 s on–off was applied for 3 min, with 17 min rest periods. Full article
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7 pages, 1268 KiB  
Proceeding Paper
Development of the Smart Jacket Featured with Medical, Sports, and Defense Attributes using Conductive Thread and Thermoelectric Fabric
by Aman Ul Azam Khan, Aurghya Kumar Saha, Zarin Tasnim Bristy, Tasnima Tazrin, Abdul Baqui and Barshan Dev
Eng. Proc. 2023, 30(1), 18; https://doi.org/10.3390/engproc2023030018 - 07 Feb 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 3946
Abstract
The exigency of humans is boosting the necessity of Smart Textiles in this modern era. A decade ago, envisioning sophisticated outerwear with several uses were considered a challenge. This study aims to a jacket with 15 features; divided into 7 groups, including defense, [...] Read more.
The exigency of humans is boosting the necessity of Smart Textiles in this modern era. A decade ago, envisioning sophisticated outerwear with several uses were considered a challenge. This study aims to a jacket with 15 features; divided into 7 groups, including defense, sports, health, medical, women, and children safety mechanisms, 4 out of these 15 functions can be controlled by an Android app, “Smart Jacket BUFT”. To avoid nonrenewable energy sources, solar power and energy harvesting technology to produce electricity from body heat and foot-powered energy were used, Smart jacket has embedded circuits and sensors alone with AD8232, MAX30100, NEO6m GPS, and ESP32 microcontrollers & voice and app-control. It is hopping that; his initial stage of growth and improvement will pave the way for subsequent activities. Full article
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7 pages, 2120 KiB  
Proceeding Paper
The Machine-Learning-Empowered Gesture Recognition Glove
by Jun Luo, Yuze Qian, Zhenyu Gao, Lei Zhang, Qinliang Zhuang and Kun Zhang
Eng. Proc. 2023, 30(1), 19; https://doi.org/10.3390/engproc2023030019 - 21 Feb 2023
Viewed by 1316
Abstract
Recently, gesture recognition technology has attracted increasing attention because it provides another means of information exchange in some special occasions, especially for auditory impaired individuals. At present, the fusion of sensor signals and artificial intelligence algorithms is the mainstream trend of gesture recognition [...] Read more.
Recently, gesture recognition technology has attracted increasing attention because it provides another means of information exchange in some special occasions, especially for auditory impaired individuals. At present, the fusion of sensor signals and artificial intelligence algorithms is the mainstream trend of gesture recognition technology. Therefore, this article designs a machine-learning-empowered gesture recognition glove. We fabricate a flexible strain sensor with a sandwich structure, which has high sensitivity and good cycle stability. After the sensors are configured in the knitted gloves, the smart gloves can respond to different gestures. Additionally, according to the representation characteristics and recognition targets of sampled signal data, we explore a segmented processing method of dynamic gesture recognition based on Logit Adaboost algorithm. After classification training, the recognition accuracy of smart gloves can reach 97%. Full article
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4 pages, 1409 KiB  
Proceeding Paper
Zinc-Ion Battery on a Polyester-Cotton Textile
by Sheng Yong, Nick Hillier and Steven Beeby
Eng. Proc. 2023, 30(1), 20; https://doi.org/10.3390/engproc2023030020 - 16 Mar 2023
Viewed by 1005
Abstract
This work presents a simple, scalable and flexible zinc-ion secondary battery, fabricated on top of a textile substrate via standard fabrication processes. The proposed zinc-ion battery was fabricated on top of a polyester-cotton textile using solution-based processes and inexpensive cathode, anode and electrolyte [...] Read more.
This work presents a simple, scalable and flexible zinc-ion secondary battery, fabricated on top of a textile substrate via standard fabrication processes. The proposed zinc-ion battery was fabricated on top of a polyester-cotton textile using solution-based processes and inexpensive cathode, anode and electrolyte materials. This battery achieved an area capacity of 19.1 µAh·cm−2 between 1.9 and 0.9 V. Full article
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