Next Issue
Volume 7, December
Previous Issue
Volume 6, December
 
 

Sinusitis, Volume 7, Issue 1 (June 2023) – 2 articles

  • Issues are regarded as officially published after their release is announced to the table of contents alert mailing list.
  • You may sign up for e-mail alerts to receive table of contents of newly released issues.
  • PDF is the official format for papers published in both, html and pdf forms. To view the papers in pdf format, click on the "PDF Full-text" link, and use the free Adobe Reader to open them.
Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:
6 pages, 4215 KiB  
Case Report
Bleach-Induced Chemical Sinusitis and Orbital Cellulitis Following Root Canal Treatment
by Terese Huiying Low, Jun Jie Seah, Somasundaram Subramaniam, Vijayaraj Thirunavukarasu and Chew Lip Ng
Sinusitis 2023, 7(1), 6-11; https://doi.org/10.3390/sinusitis7010002 - 31 May 2023
Viewed by 4105
Abstract
The authors describe an unusual case of chemical sinusitis and orbital cellulitis secondary to a sodium hypochlorite accident in a patient who had just undergone root canal treatment. The patient presented with acute, progressive symptoms of unilateral maxillary sinusitis, facial cellulitis and orbital [...] Read more.
The authors describe an unusual case of chemical sinusitis and orbital cellulitis secondary to a sodium hypochlorite accident in a patient who had just undergone root canal treatment. The patient presented with acute, progressive symptoms of unilateral maxillary sinusitis, facial cellulitis and orbital cellulitis which began hours after root canal treatment on the ipsilateral side. He was admitted to hospital under the care of the Otorhinolaryngology team and reviewed regularly by the Ophthalmologists. He underwent Endoscopic Sinus Surgery during his hospital stay. The intraoperative findings revealed necrotic sinus mucosa and slough within the involved maxillary sinus, which were suggestive of chemical burn injury induced by the highly alkaline sodium hypochlorite solution used during root canal treatment. He was treated postoperatively with regular nasal toilet, culture-directed antibiotics and topical ocular pressure-lowering eyedrops. He displayed a slow recovery with eventually no orbital sequelae, but experienced persistent cheek numbness three months post-injury. Severe chemical sinusitis with orbital cellulitis secondary to sodium hypochlorite accident is a rare complication of root canal treatment, with potentially severe consequences. It can present with symptoms similar to complicated acute bacterial sinusitis. Otorhinolaryngologists and dental surgeons should maintain a high index of suspicion when managing a patient post-root canal treatment with symptoms of unilateral sinusitis, facial cellulitis, orbital cellulitis and even airway compromise. This would allow prompt intervention before sight or life-threatening complications set in. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

5 pages, 458 KiB  
Brief Report
Patient-Reported Outcomes with Benralizumab in Patients with Severe Eosinophilic Asthma and Severe Chronic Rhinosinusitis with Nasal Polyps
by Rory Chan, Kirsten Stewart, Rasads Misirovs and Brian Lipworth
Sinusitis 2023, 7(1), 1-5; https://doi.org/10.3390/sinusitis7010001 - 29 Mar 2023
Viewed by 1730
Abstract
Introduction: Chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) and severe eosinophilic asthma (SEA) are common comorbidities characterised by type 2 inflammation associated with increased expression of interleukin 5. Methods: Eight patients with SEA and severe CRSwNP attended the Scottish Centre for Respiratory Research as [...] Read more.
Introduction: Chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) and severe eosinophilic asthma (SEA) are common comorbidities characterised by type 2 inflammation associated with increased expression of interleukin 5. Methods: Eight patients with SEA and severe CRSwNP attended the Scottish Centre for Respiratory Research as part of a clinical trial (EudraCT number 2019-003763-22). Following an initial 4-week run-in period (baseline) when patients took their usual inhaled and intranasal corticosteroid treatment for SEA and CRSwNP, they all received subcutaneous benralizumab 30 mg q4w for 12 weeks. Results: Following 12 weeks of benralizumab, no significant differences were detected in nasal global symptom visual analogue score (VAS), hyposmia VAS, total nasal symptom score, or peak nasal inspiratory flow. In contrast, Asthma Control Questionnaire significantly improved along with near-complete depletion of peripheral blood eosinophils by 99%, while eosinophil-derived neurotoxin fell by 72%. Conclusions: Greater improvements in patient-reported outcomes related to asthma were observed than with CRSwNP in response to benralizumab. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Previous Issue
Next Issue
Back to TopTop