Next Issue
Previous Issue

Table of Contents

Reports, Volume 1, Issue 2 (September 2018)

  • Issues are regarded as officially published after their release is announced to the table of contents alert mailing list.
  • You may sign up for e-mail alerts to receive table of contents of newly released issues.
  • PDF is the official format for papers published in both, html and pdf forms. To view the papers in pdf format, click on the "PDF Full-text" link, and use the free Adobe Readerexternal link to open them.
View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-5
Export citation of selected articles as:
Open AccessCase Report Second Primary Spindle Cell Carcinoma of Oral Cavity and Oropharynx: A Case Report and Literature Review
Received: 26 August 2018 / Revised: 4 September 2018 / Accepted: 5 September 2018 / Published: 12 September 2018
Viewed by 445 | PDF Full-text (2314 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Spindle cell squamous cell carcinoma (SpCC) is a poorly differentiated subtype of squamous cell carcinoma (SqCC). We report a case with second primary oropharyngeal SpCC after seven years of complete treatment of SqCC. The patient underwent surgery and adjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Relevant literature about
[...] Read more.
Spindle cell squamous cell carcinoma (SpCC) is a poorly differentiated subtype of squamous cell carcinoma (SqCC). We report a case with second primary oropharyngeal SpCC after seven years of complete treatment of SqCC. The patient underwent surgery and adjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Relevant literature about SpCC was reviewed. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessCase Report Transhepatic Vascular Access for Implantation of a Watchman Left Atrial Appendage Closure Device
Received: 31 July 2018 / Revised: 26 August 2018 / Accepted: 27 August 2018 / Published: 6 September 2018
Viewed by 372 | PDF Full-text (1391 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Conventional access through femoral veins may be limited due to tortuosity and venous occlusion secondary to venous thrombosis or congenital anomalies. Another alternative is subclavian veins, but the difficulty in catheter manipulation and stability makes it less favorable in comparison to the transhepatic
[...] Read more.
Conventional access through femoral veins may be limited due to tortuosity and venous occlusion secondary to venous thrombosis or congenital anomalies. Another alternative is subclavian veins, but the difficulty in catheter manipulation and stability makes it less favorable in comparison to the transhepatic access for the delivery of the Watchman device. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessCase Report Rett Syndrome: Treatment with IGF-I, Melatonin, Blackcurrant Extracts, and Rehabilitation
Received: 6 August 2018 / Revised: 30 August 2018 / Accepted: 2 September 2018 / Published: 4 September 2018
Viewed by 350 | PDF Full-text (23355 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
(1) This study describes the good evolution of a 6-year-old girl genetically diagnosed (R106X) with Rett syndrome (RTT), after having been treated with IGF-I, melatonin (MT), blackcurrant extracts (BC) and rehabilitated for 6 months. (2) The patient stopped normal development in the first
[...] Read more.
(1) This study describes the good evolution of a 6-year-old girl genetically diagnosed (R106X) with Rett syndrome (RTT), after having been treated with IGF-I, melatonin (MT), blackcurrant extracts (BC) and rehabilitated for 6 months. (2) The patient stopped normal development in the first year of age. The patient showed short stature and weight and fulfilled the main criteria for typical RTT. Despite her young age, there was pubic hair (Tanner II), very high plasma testosterone, and low levels of plasma gonadotrophins. There were no adrenal enzymatic deficits, and abdominal ultrasound studies were normal. The treatment consisted of IGF-I (0.04 mg/kg/day, 5 days/week, subcutaneous (sc)) for 3 months and then 15 days of rest, MT (50 mg/day, orally, without interruption) and neurorehabilitation. A new blood test, after 3 months of treatment, was absolutely normal and the pubic hair disappeared (Tanner I). Then, a new treatment was started with IGF-I, MT, and BC for another 3 months. In this period, the degree of pubertal development increased to Tanner III (pubic level), without a known cause. (3) The treatment followed led to clear improvements in most of the initial abnormalities, perhaps due to the neurotrophic effect of IGF-I, the antioxidant effects of MT and BC, and the cerebral increase in the cyclic glycine-proline (cGP) achieved with administration of BC. (4) A continuous treatment with IGF-I, MT, and BC appears to be useful in RTT. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessCase Report Successful Amplified-Natural-Killer Cell (ANK) Therapy Administered to a Patient with Smoldering Adult T-Cell Leukemia in Acute Crisis
Received: 22 July 2018 / Revised: 7 August 2018 / Accepted: 13 August 2018 / Published: 14 August 2018
Viewed by 692 | PDF Full-text (1669 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) is an indolent leukemia caused by type 1 human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV-1). A variety of therapeutic interventions via immunological approaches have been attempted. ATL cells express costimulatory molecules of natural killer (NK) cells, and a new modality—amplified NK
[...] Read more.
Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) is an indolent leukemia caused by type 1 human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV-1). A variety of therapeutic interventions via immunological approaches have been attempted. ATL cells express costimulatory molecules of natural killer (NK) cells, and a new modality—amplified NK (ANK) cell treatment—was administered here to a patient with ATL. A 70-year-old female presenting with ringworm infection received a diagnosis of smoldering ATL in 2004. Monitoring of soluble IL-2 receptors (sIL-2Rs) in the serum showed disease exacerbation in 2007, associated with the enlargement of lymph nodes and formation of a skin tumor. NK cells were amplified by in vitro cell culture methods. To avoid cytokine release syndrome, 2–5 × 108 cells were administered with each injection. A total of 15 injections from 12 November 2007 to 15 February 2008 were administered to this patient. This case showed drastic downregulation of sIL-2R, resulting in the induction of complete remission, which lasted for >5 years. This is the first report of treatment of a patient with ATL using ANK cell therapy. More attempts of this therapy will enhance our insight into the appropriate application of this new therapy to clinically diverse patients. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessCase Report TB Presenting as Recurrent Pneumonia in a HIV-Infected Infant in Central Viet Nam
Received: 19 July 2018 / Revised: 6 August 2018 / Accepted: 6 August 2018 / Published: 7 August 2018
Viewed by 894 | PDF Full-text (1318 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
We report on a six-month-old infant admitted to our intensive care unit (ICU) with recurrent severe pneumonia. The mother was infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected, but initially failed to disclose this to doctors. Neither did she report the grandmother of the child’s
[...] Read more.
We report on a six-month-old infant admitted to our intensive care unit (ICU) with recurrent severe pneumonia. The mother was infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected, but initially failed to disclose this to doctors. Neither did she report the grandmother of the child’s chronic coughing, likely due to tuberculosis (TB). The infant was diagnosed with X-pert MTB/RIF® confirmed TB and tested positive for HIV infection. Once a correct diagnosis was established, the child demonstrated good recovery with appropriate TB and antiretroviral treatment (ART). The case demonstrates the importance of including TB in the differential diagnosis for young children not responding to first-line pneumonia treatment, especially in TB endemic areas. Taking a meticulous TB and HIV exposure history, with careful consideration of potential social stigma, is essential. It also demonstrates how the inaccessibility of HIV results and the absence of a continuous patient record may jeopardize patient care. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Back to Top