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Dent. J., Volume 3, Issue 2 (June 2015) – 4 articles , Pages 24-76

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1464 KiB  
Case Report
Arrested Pneumatization of the Sphenoid Sinus on Large Field-of-View Cone Beam Computed Tomography Studies
by Mehrnaz Tahmasbi-Arashlow, Sevin Barghan, Jeffrey Bennett, Rujuta A. Katkar and Madhu K. Nair
Dent. J. 2015, 3(2), 67-76; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj3020067 - 11 May 2015
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 13130
Abstract
Arrested pneumatization of the sphenoid sinus is a normal anatomical variant. The aim of this report is to define cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) characteristics of arrested pneumatization of sphenoid sinus in an effort to help differentiate it from invasive or lytic skull [...] Read more.
Arrested pneumatization of the sphenoid sinus is a normal anatomical variant. The aim of this report is to define cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) characteristics of arrested pneumatization of sphenoid sinus in an effort to help differentiate it from invasive or lytic skull base lesions. Two cases are presented with incidental findings. Both studies, acquired for other diagnostic purposes, demonstrated unique osseous patterns that were eventually deemed to be anatomic variations in the absence of clinical signs and symptoms although the pattern of bone loss and remodeling was diagnosed as pneumatization of the sphenoid sinus by a panel of medical and maxillofacial radiologists following contrasted advanced imaging. It is important to differentiate arrested pneumatization of the sphenoid sinus from lesions, such as arachnoid granulations, acoustic neuroma, glioma, metastatic lesions, meningioma, or chordoma, to prevent unnecessary biopsies or exploratory surgeries that would consequently reduce treatment costs and alleviate anxiety in patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tomography in Dentistry)
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1478 KiB  
Article
Randomized Clinical Investigation of Titanium Implants with and without Platform Switching: Six Months’ Radiographic and Clinical Outcome
by Roberto Rossi, Diego Capri, Emanuele Risciotti and Paul Zeman
Dent. J. 2015, 3(2), 55-66; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj3020055 - 23 Apr 2015
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Abstract
The aim of this study was to obtain a randomized, clinical and radiological comparison of implants with and without platform switching (PFS). The two compared titanium implant types differed only in the microgap position: test (PFS) or control (StE, no PFS). All implants [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to obtain a randomized, clinical and radiological comparison of implants with and without platform switching (PFS). The two compared titanium implant types differed only in the microgap position: test (PFS) or control (StE, no PFS). All implants were inserted in posterior regions and followed up for six months after abutment connection (AC). Twenty one patients with 21 PFS and 18 StE implants completed the six-month evaluation. No implant failed. One complication (exposed cap screw) was reported at AC. No statistically significant difference was observed between the marginal bone level of PFS and StE implants. Their bone level stabilized approximately 1 mm below the microgap. Based on the outcome of this short-term study with a limited number of patients, it seems unlikely that the optimal clinical and radiological outcome obtained with the tested standard implant (no PFS) can be improved by introducing an inward microgap shift (PFS). Full article
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1197 KiB  
Article
Effect of Long-Term Consumption of Lactobacillus paracasei SD1 on Reducing Mutans streptococci and Caries Risk: A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial
by Rawee Teanpaisan, Supatcharin Piwat, Sukanya Tianviwat, Benchamat Sophatha and Thanyanan Kampoo
Dent. J. 2015, 3(2), 43-54; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj3020043 - 1 Apr 2015
Cited by 30 | Viewed by 8809
Abstract
Background: A previous study revealed Lactobacillus paracasei SD1, a probiotic strain, could reduce mutans streptococci (MS). The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term effects of L. paracasei SD1 on the colonization of MS, and whether caries lesions developed. Methods: After [...] Read more.
Background: A previous study revealed Lactobacillus paracasei SD1, a probiotic strain, could reduce mutans streptococci (MS). The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term effects of L. paracasei SD1 on the colonization of MS, and whether caries lesions developed. Methods: After informed consent, 122 children were recruited and randomly assigned to the probiotic or control groups. The probiotic group received milk-powder containing L. paracasei SD1 and the control group received standard milk-powder once daily for six months. Salivary MS and lactobacilli were enumerated using differential culture at baseline and at three-month intervals for 12 months. The persistence of L. paracasei SD1 was investigated using AP-PCR for DNA-fingerprinting. Oral health was examined at baseline and at the end of the study according to WHO criteria. Results: The long-term consumption could prolong colonization of L. paracasei SD1. Significantly reduced MS counts and increased lactobacilli levels were found among children in the probiotic group. There were less caries lesions in the probiotic group at the end of the study. A significant reduction of the development of new caries lesions (4.5 times) was observed in the high caries risk group but not in the low caries risk group. Conclusions: Results demonstrate that the long-term daily ingestion of the human-derived probiotic L. paracasei SD1 significantly reduces the number of MS and caries risk in the high caries group. Full article
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237 KiB  
Article
The Peri-Implant and Periodontal Microbiota in Patients with and without Clinical Signs of Inflammation
by Meike Luise Jakobi, Sascha Nico Stumpp, Meike Stiesch, Jörg Eberhard and Wieland Heuer
Dent. J. 2015, 3(2), 24-42; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj3020024 - 31 Mar 2015
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 6959
Abstract
Late implant failures, caused by the inflammation of surrounding tissues are a problem in implant dentistry. The path of bacterial transmission from teeth to implants is not completely understood. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to analyze intraindividual bacterial transmission characterizing subgingival [...] Read more.
Late implant failures, caused by the inflammation of surrounding tissues are a problem in implant dentistry. The path of bacterial transmission from teeth to implants is not completely understood. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to analyze intraindividual bacterial transmission characterizing subgingival microbiomes in teeth and implants, both in healthy subjects and in those with signs of periodontitis or peri-implantitis. Samples of peri-implant and dental sulcus fluid were collected. To identify the predominant microbiota, amplified fragments of bacterial 16S rRNA gene were separated by single strand conformation polymorphism analysis, sequenced and taxonomically classified. A total of 25 different predominant genera were found in the diseased group and 14 genera in the healthy group. Species richness did not differ significantly between implants, neighboring teeth and teeth with largest probing depth in the diseased group. Additionally, no differences between teeth and implants in the healthy group were detected. In contrast, microbial diversity varied between the different sampling points. Species richness is similar in healthy and diseased sites, but the composition of the bacterial community differed within the individual subjects. The underlying analyses strongly suggest that complete transmission from neighboring teeth to implants is unlikely. Full article
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