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Children 2019, 6(3), 45; https://doi.org/10.3390/children6030045

Longitudinal Fibular Deficiency: A Cross-Sectional Study Comparing Lower Limb Function of Children and Young People with That of Unaffected Peers

1
Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, New South Wales 2109, Australia
2
The Children’s Hospital at Westmead, Westmead, New South Wales 2145, Australia
3
Faculty of Health Sciences, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia
4
School of Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Health and Environmental Sciences, Auckland University of Technology, Auckland 1142, New Zealand
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 15 February 2019 / Revised: 11 March 2019 / Accepted: 12 March 2019 / Published: 15 March 2019
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Abstract

Longitudinal fibular deficiency (LFD), or fibular hemimelia, is congenital partial or complete absence of the fibula. We aimed to compare the lower limb function of children and young people with LFD to that of unaffected peers. A cross-sectional study of Australian children and young people with LFD, and of unaffected peers, was undertaken. Twenty-three (12 males) children and young people with LFD (74% of those eligible) and 213 unaffected peers, all aged 7–21 years were subject to the Knee Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS/KOOS-Child) and the Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool (CAIT/CAIT-Youth). Linear regression models compared affected children and young people to unaffected peers. Participants with LFD scored lower in both outcomes (adjusted p < 0.05). The difference between participants with LFD and unaffected peers was significantly greater among younger participants than older participants for KOOS activities and sports domain scores (adjusted p ≤ 0.01). Differences in the other KOOS domains (pain/symptoms/quality of life) and ankle function (CAIT scores) were not affected by age (adjusted p ≥ 0.08). Children and young people with LFD on average report reduced lower limb function compared to unaffected peers. Knee-related activities and sports domains appear to be worse in younger children with LFD, and scores in these domains become closer to those of unaffected peers as they become older. View Full-Text
Keywords: longitudinal fibular deficiency; lower limb function; children; young people; unaffected peers; KOOS; KOOS-Child; CAIT; CAIT-Youth longitudinal fibular deficiency; lower limb function; children; young people; unaffected peers; KOOS; KOOS-Child; CAIT; CAIT-Youth
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Pate, J.W.; Hancock, M.J.; Tofts, L.; Epps, A.; Baldwin, J.N.; McKay, M.J.; Burns, J.; Morris, E.; Pacey, V. Longitudinal Fibular Deficiency: A Cross-Sectional Study Comparing Lower Limb Function of Children and Young People with That of Unaffected Peers. Children 2019, 6, 45.

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