Next Issue
Volume 8, June
Previous Issue
Volume 8, December

Table of Contents

Proteomes, Volume 8, Issue 1 (March 2020) – 5 articles

  • Issues are regarded as officially published after their release is announced to the table of contents alert mailing list.
  • You may sign up for e-mail alerts to receive table of contents of newly released issues.
  • PDF is the official format for papers published in both, html and pdf forms. To view the papers in pdf format, click on the "PDF Full-text" link, and use the free Adobe Readerexternal link to open them.
Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:
Open AccessArticle
Targeting a Subset of the Membrane Proteome for Top–Down Mass Spectrometry: Introducing the Proteolipidome
Proteomes 2020, 8(1), 5; https://doi.org/10.3390/proteomes8010005 - 10 Mar 2020
Viewed by 562
Abstract
A subsection of integral membrane proteins partition into chloroform during a chloroform/methanol/water extraction primarily designed to extract lipids. Traditionally, these proteins were called proteolipids due to their lipid-like properties; the c-subunit of the ATP synthase integral FO component is the best known due [...] Read more.
A subsection of integral membrane proteins partition into chloroform during a chloroform/methanol/water extraction primarily designed to extract lipids. Traditionally, these proteins were called proteolipids due to their lipid-like properties; the c-subunit of the ATP synthase integral FO component is the best known due to its abundance. In this manuscript, we investigate purification of proteolipid proteins away from lipids for high-resolution mass spectrometry. Size-exclusion chromatography on silica beads using a chloroform/methanol/aqueous formic acid (4/4/1; v/v) mobile phase allowed the separation of larger proteins (>3 kDa) from lipids (<1.5 kDa) and analysis by online electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Fraction collection for mass spectrometry was limited by presence of plasticizers and other contaminants solubilized by chloroform. Drying down of the protein sample followed by resuspension in formic acid (70%) allowed reverse-phase chromatography on a polymeric support at elevated temperature, as described previously. Fractions collected in this way could be stored for extended periods at −80 °C without adducts or contaminants. Top–down mass spectrometry enabled the definition of PsaI as a novel proteolipid of spinach thylakoid membrane. Proteolipid preparation worked similarly when total membranes from mouse brains were extracted with chloroform. While it might be tempting to use the described extraction, we prefer to broaden the meaning of the term, whereby the proteolipidome is defined as a novel biological membrane proteome that includes the full complement of membrane proteins, their binding partners/ligands and their tightly bound structural lipids that constitute each protein–lipid complex’s functional unit; that is, a complete description of a biological membrane. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Top-down Proteomics: In Memory of Dr. Alfred Yergey)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
Proteomics-Based Detection of Immune Dysfunction in an Elite Adventure Athlete Trekking Across the Antarctica
Proteomes 2020, 8(1), 4; https://doi.org/10.3390/proteomes8010004 - 03 Mar 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 3305
Abstract
Proteomics monitoring of an elite adventure athlete (age 33 years) was conducted over a 28-week period that culminated in the successful, solo, unassisted, and unsupported two month trek across the Antarctica (1500 km). Training distress was monitored weekly using a 19-item, validated training [...] Read more.
Proteomics monitoring of an elite adventure athlete (age 33 years) was conducted over a 28-week period that culminated in the successful, solo, unassisted, and unsupported two month trek across the Antarctica (1500 km). Training distress was monitored weekly using a 19-item, validated training distress scale (TDS). Weekly dried blood spot (DBS) specimens were collected via fingerprick blood drops onto standard blood spot cards. DBS proteins were measured with nano-electrospray ionization liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (nanoLC-MS/MS) in data-independent acquisition (DIA) mode, and 712 proteins were identified and quantified. The 28-week period was divided into time segments based on TDS scores, and a contrast analysis between weeks five and eight (low TDS) and between weeks 20 and 23 (high TDS, last month of Antarctica trek) showed that 31 proteins (n = 20 immune related) were upregulated and 35 (n = 17 immune related) were downregulated. Protein–protein interaction (PPI) networks supported a dichotomous immune response. Gene ontology (GO) biological process terms for the upregulated immune proteins showed an increase in regulation of the immune system process, especially inflammation, complement activation, and leukocyte mediated immunity. At the same time, GO terms for the downregulated immune-related proteins indicated a decrease in several aspects of the overall immune system process including neutrophil degranulation and the antimicrobial humoral response. These proteomics data support a dysfunctional immune response in an elite adventure athlete during a sustained period of mental and physical distress while trekking solo across the Antarctica. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Human Proteomics)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
Comparative Proteomics of Root Apex and Root Elongation Zones Provides Insights into Molecular Mechanisms for Drought Stress and Recovery Adjustment in Switchgrass
Proteomes 2020, 8(1), 3; https://doi.org/10.3390/proteomes8010003 - 19 Feb 2020
Viewed by 424
Abstract
Switchgrass plants were grown in a Sandwich tube system to induce gradual drought stress by withholding watering. After 29 days, the leaf photosynthetic rate decreased significantly, compared to the control plants which were watered regularly. The drought-treated plants recovered to the same leaf [...] Read more.
Switchgrass plants were grown in a Sandwich tube system to induce gradual drought stress by withholding watering. After 29 days, the leaf photosynthetic rate decreased significantly, compared to the control plants which were watered regularly. The drought-treated plants recovered to the same leaf water content after three days of re-watering. The root tip (1cm basal fragment, designated as RT1 hereafter) and the elongation/maturation zone (the next upper 1 cm tissue, designated as RT2 hereafter) tissues were collected at the 29th day of drought stress treatment, (named SDT for severe drought treated), after one (D1W) and three days (D3W) of re-watering. The tandem mass tags mass spectrometry-based quantitative proteomics analysis was performed to identify the proteomes, and drought-induced differentially accumulated proteins (DAPs). From RT1 tissues, 6156, 7687, and 7699 proteins were quantified, and 296, 535, and 384 DAPs were identified in the SDT, D1W, and D3W samples, respectively. From RT2 tissues, 7382, 7255, and 6883 proteins were quantified, and 393, 587, and 321 proteins DAPs were identified in the SDT, D1W, and D3W samples. Between RT1 and RT2 tissues, very few DAPs overlapped at SDT, but the number of such proteins increased during the recovery phase. A large number of hydrophilic proteins and stress-responsive proteins were induced during SDT and remained at a higher level during the recovery stages. A large number of DAPs in RT1 tissues maintained the same expression pattern throughout drought treatment and the recovery phases. The DAPs in RT1 tissues were classified in cell proliferation, mitotic cell division, and chromatin modification, and those in RT2 were placed in cell wall remodeling and cell expansion processes. This study provided information pertaining to root zone-specific proteome changes during drought and recover phases, which will allow us to select proteins (genes) as better defined targets for developing drought tolerant plants. The mass spectrometry proteomics data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD017441. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessFeature PaperEditorial
Acknowledgement to Reviewers of Proteomes in 2019
Proteomes 2020, 8(1), 2; https://doi.org/10.3390/proteomes8010002 - 22 Jan 2020
Viewed by 410
Abstract
The editorial team greatly appreciates the reviewers who have dedicated their considerable time and expertise to the journal’s rigorous editorial process over the past 12 months, regardless of whether the papers are finally published or not [...] Full article
Open AccessFeature PaperEditorial
Special Issue “Top-down Proteomics: In Memory of Dr Alfred Yergey”. Alfred Linwood Yergey, III, 17 September 1941–27 May 2018
Proteomes 2020, 8(1), 1; https://doi.org/10.3390/proteomes8010001 - 15 Jan 2020
Viewed by 440
Abstract
Please see J [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Top-down Proteomics: In Memory of Dr. Alfred Yergey)
Previous Issue
Next Issue
Back to TopTop