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Open AccessArticle

Printed Versus Electronic Texts in Inclusive Environments: Comparison Research on the Reading Comprehension Skills and Vocabulary Acquisition of Special Needs Students

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Department of Special Education, Cyprus International University, Nicosia 99258, Northern Cyprus
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Department of Turkish Language Education, Faculty of Education, European University of Lefke, Mersin 10 Turkey, 99728, Northern Cyprus
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Educ. Sci. 2019, 9(3), 246; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci9030246
Received: 14 July 2019 / Revised: 15 September 2019 / Accepted: 17 September 2019 / Published: 19 September 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Perspectives on Special Education)
In this research, an effort is made to compare the effectiveness of reading texts presented through electronic books in a computer environment and regular (printed) texts, in terms of the development of the reading comprehension and vocabulary acquisition skills of students with special needs within inclusive educational environments. The research was designed with ‘Adaptive Alternating Applications’, and the study group of the research was formed by using the ‘purposive sampling’ method. As a requirement of the research design used, two special needs students were studied. According to the results of the study, the vocabulary acquisition levels of both students produced more effective results in presentations made with electronic texts, and in addition, electronic texts were found to be more effective in improving reading comprehension skills than printed texts. View Full-Text
Keywords: special education; inclusion; reading comprehension skills; electronic texts; printed texts special education; inclusion; reading comprehension skills; electronic texts; printed texts
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Dağlı Gökbulut, Ö.; Güneyli, A. Printed Versus Electronic Texts in Inclusive Environments: Comparison Research on the Reading Comprehension Skills and Vocabulary Acquisition of Special Needs Students. Educ. Sci. 2019, 9, 246.

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