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Article

Clinical Characteristics of Nursing- and Healthcare-Associated Tuberculosis

1
Department of Respiratory Medicine, National Hospital Organization Nagara Medical Center, 1300-7 Nagara, Gifu 502-8558, Japan
2
Department of Informative Clinical Medicine, Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu 501-1194, Japan
3
Department of Gastroenterology/Internal Medicine, Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu 501-1194, Japan
4
Biological Support Center, Gifu University Hospital, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu 501-1194, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Diseases 2018, 6(4), 101; https://doi.org/10.3390/diseases6040101
Received: 11 October 2018 / Revised: 6 November 2018 / Accepted: 7 November 2018 / Published: 11 November 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chronic Inflammatory and Infectious Diseases)
Tuberculosis remains a serious health problem worldwide. Patients with tuberculosis who also require nursing care due to aging and underlying diseases are considered to have a high mortality rate; however, there are few studies describing detailed examinations of such disease conditions. Objective: The present study was conducted to investigate differences in clinical features of elderly tuberculosis patients according to the levels of nursing and healthcare required. Design: The study participants included 146 elderly (≥65 years) patients diagnosed with active tuberculosis among patients hospitalized with tuberculosis at a single center. The patients were classified into two groups: a nursing- and healthcare-associated tuberculosis group (n = 71) and a community-acquired tuberculosis group (n = 75). Results: The nursing- and healthcare-associated tuberculosis patients were older and had a higher frequency of comorbidities compared with the community-acquired tuberculosis group. Patients in the nursing- and healthcare-associated tuberculosis group had markedly lower levels of serum albumin and hemoglobin, and higher levels of C-reactive protein. The rate of in-hospital death was significantly higher in the nursing- and healthcare-associated tuberculosis group. This was attributed to malnutrition and comorbid conditions rather than the severity of tuberculosis. Conclusion: The prognosis was poor in elderly tuberculosis patients receiving nursing and healthcare. View Full-Text
Keywords: elderly tuberculosis patients; community-acquired tuberculosis; NHCAP elderly tuberculosis patients; community-acquired tuberculosis; NHCAP
MDPI and ACS Style

Suzuki, T.; Kato, T.; Ohnishi, R.; Yasuda, S.; Sano, K.; Shirakami, Y.; Shimizu, M.; Murakami, N. Clinical Characteristics of Nursing- and Healthcare-Associated Tuberculosis. Diseases 2018, 6, 101. https://doi.org/10.3390/diseases6040101

AMA Style

Suzuki T, Kato T, Ohnishi R, Yasuda S, Sano K, Shirakami Y, Shimizu M, Murakami N. Clinical Characteristics of Nursing- and Healthcare-Associated Tuberculosis. Diseases. 2018; 6(4):101. https://doi.org/10.3390/diseases6040101

Chicago/Turabian Style

Suzuki, Toshitaka, Tatsuo Kato, Ryoko Ohnishi, Shigeo Yasuda, Kimiyasu Sano, Yohei Shirakami, Masahito Shimizu, and Nobuo Murakami. 2018. "Clinical Characteristics of Nursing- and Healthcare-Associated Tuberculosis" Diseases 6, no. 4: 101. https://doi.org/10.3390/diseases6040101

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