Special Issue "Chronic Inflammatory and Infectious Diseases"

A special issue of Diseases (ISSN 2079-9721). This special issue belongs to the section "Infectious Disease".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Helieh S. Oz

University of Kentucky Medical Center, Lexington, KY, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: inflammatory and infectious diseases; nutrients; antioxidants; reactive oxygen radical; gastrointestinal inflammation; inflammatory bowel disease; microbial; parasitic and fungal infectious diseases; hepatic; pancreatic complication; models of infections and inflammation; nutraceutical and therapeutic discoveries
Co-Guest Editor
Dr. Veeranoot Nissapatorn

School of Allied Health Sciences, Walailak University, Thailand
Website | E-Mail
Interests: infectious parasitic diseases; epidemiology; clinical relevant; diagnostic challenges

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Millions of patients suffer from some form of chronic inflammatory diseases, with no available cure yet. Inflammation is a defensive body response to various injuries initiated by pathogens, chemicals, and cell damage. While inflammation is required in the body healing process, a persistent and excessive immune response is a significant risk factor for developing chronic inflammatory diseases and various related complications. Gastrointestinal infections alter the gut microbiome and increase the gut’s permeability to toxins. Infections with parasitic, microbial, fungal, and viral agents stimulate the immune response and inflammation. Invasions by pathogenic diseases are linked to the initiation of chronic inflammatory responses and accompanying complications, such as hepatic, pancreatic, cardiovascular, colic, gastrointestinal, and neurodegenerative disorders.

Investigators are invited to submit related original basic, clinical, and translational studies, papers on novel therapeutics and their mechanisms of action, as well as review papers through the Manuscript Tracking System at:

https://susy.mdpi.com/user/manuscripts/upload?journal=diseases

Dr. Helieh S. Oz
Guest Editor


Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Diseases is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 350 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • chronic inflammation
  • infectious disease
  • parasitic infection
  • microbial infection
  • fungal infections
  • gastrointestinal
  • cardiovascular
  • digestive disease

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Clinical Characteristics of Nursing- and Healthcare-Associated Tuberculosis
Diseases 2018, 6(4), 101; https://doi.org/10.3390/diseases6040101
Received: 11 October 2018 / Revised: 6 November 2018 / Accepted: 7 November 2018 / Published: 11 November 2018
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Abstract
Tuberculosis remains a serious health problem worldwide. Patients with tuberculosis who also require nursing care due to aging and underlying diseases are considered to have a high mortality rate; however, there are few studies describing detailed examinations of such disease conditions. Objective: The
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Tuberculosis remains a serious health problem worldwide. Patients with tuberculosis who also require nursing care due to aging and underlying diseases are considered to have a high mortality rate; however, there are few studies describing detailed examinations of such disease conditions. Objective: The present study was conducted to investigate differences in clinical features of elderly tuberculosis patients according to the levels of nursing and healthcare required. Design: The study participants included 146 elderly (≥65 years) patients diagnosed with active tuberculosis among patients hospitalized with tuberculosis at a single center. The patients were classified into two groups: a nursing- and healthcare-associated tuberculosis group (n = 71) and a community-acquired tuberculosis group (n = 75). Results: The nursing- and healthcare-associated tuberculosis patients were older and had a higher frequency of comorbidities compared with the community-acquired tuberculosis group. Patients in the nursing- and healthcare-associated tuberculosis group had markedly lower levels of serum albumin and hemoglobin, and higher levels of C-reactive protein. The rate of in-hospital death was significantly higher in the nursing- and healthcare-associated tuberculosis group. This was attributed to malnutrition and comorbid conditions rather than the severity of tuberculosis. Conclusion: The prognosis was poor in elderly tuberculosis patients receiving nursing and healthcare. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chronic Inflammatory and Infectious Diseases)

Other

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Open AccessCase Report Central Nervous System Vasculitis for Cryptococcosis in an Immunocompetent Patient
Received: 14 August 2018 / Revised: 25 August 2018 / Accepted: 28 August 2018 / Published: 31 August 2018
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Abstract
Cryptococcal meningitis is a life-threatening condition caused by a fungal pathogen, Cryptococcus neoformans, that can infect both immunosuppressed and immunocompetent hosts. It is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in severely immunodeficient patients. However, in an immunocompetent patient it represents a
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Cryptococcal meningitis is a life-threatening condition caused by a fungal pathogen, Cryptococcus neoformans, that can infect both immunosuppressed and immunocompetent hosts. It is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in severely immunodeficient patients. However, in an immunocompetent patient it represents a diagnostic challenge, mainly because it is extremely rare, but also because of its nonspecific clinical manifestation. Neurovascular involvement in cryptococcal meningitis is rare and not well known and only few reports have described this association. We describe a cryptococcal meningitis in an immunocompetent patient associated with central nervous system vasculitis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chronic Inflammatory and Infectious Diseases)
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