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Fibers, Volume 7, Issue 6 (June 2019)

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Cover Story (view full-size image) Tremolite in nature can be in prismatic or fibrous (asbestos). The excavation of rocks containing [...] Read more.
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Open AccessArticle
Cotton Cellulose-CdTe Quantum Dots Composite Films with Inhibition of Biofilm-Forming S. aureus
Fibers 2019, 7(6), 57; https://doi.org/10.3390/fib7060057
Received: 15 May 2019 / Revised: 3 June 2019 / Accepted: 11 June 2019 / Published: 19 June 2019
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Abstract
A cellulose-cadmium (Cd)-tellurium (TE) quantum dots (QDs) composite film was successfully synthesized by incorporating CdTe QDs onto a cellulose matrix derived from waste cotton linters. Cellulose-CdTe QDs composite film was characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy, [...] Read more.
A cellulose-cadmium (Cd)-tellurium (TE) quantum dots (QDs) composite film was successfully synthesized by incorporating CdTe QDs onto a cellulose matrix derived from waste cotton linters. Cellulose-CdTe QDs composite film was characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The antibacterial activity of the prepared composite film was investigated using the multidrug-resistance (MTR) Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. In vitro antibacterial assays demonstrated that CdTe QDs composite film can efficiently inhibit biofilm formation. Our results showed that the cellulose-CdTe QDs composite film is a promising candidate for biomedical applications including wound dressing, medical instruments, burn treatments, implants, and other biotechnology fields. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Progress in Cellulose Dissolution and Regeneration)
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Open AccessArticle
Hydrogel Nanofibers from Carboxymethyl Sago Pulp and Its Controlled Release Studies as a Methylene Blue Drug Carrier
Fibers 2019, 7(6), 56; https://doi.org/10.3390/fib7060056
Received: 12 May 2019 / Revised: 28 May 2019 / Accepted: 3 June 2019 / Published: 15 June 2019
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Abstract
The potential use of carboxymethyl sago pulp (CMSP) extracted from sago waste for producing hydrogel nanofibers was investigated as a methylene blue drug carrier. Sago pulp was chemically modified via carboxymethylation reaction to form carboxymethyl sago pulp (CMSP) and subsequently used to produce [...] Read more.
The potential use of carboxymethyl sago pulp (CMSP) extracted from sago waste for producing hydrogel nanofibers was investigated as a methylene blue drug carrier. Sago pulp was chemically modified via carboxymethylation reaction to form carboxymethyl sago pulp (CMSP) and subsequently used to produce nanofibers using the electrospinning method with the addition of poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO). The CMSP nanofibers were further treated with citric acid to form cross-linked hydrogel. Studies on the percentage of swelling following the variation of citric acid concentrations and curing temperature showed that 89.20 ± 0.42% of methylene blue (MB) was loaded onto CMSP hydrogel nanofibers with the percentage of swelling 4366 ± 975%. Meanwhile, methylene blue controlled release studies revealed that the diffusion of methylene blue was influenced by the pH of buffer solution with 19.44% of MB released at pH 7.34 within 48 h indicating the potential of CMSP hydrogel nanofibers to be used as a drug carrier for MB. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Electrospun Polymer Nanofibers for Food and Health Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
Effects of Hygrothermal Ageing on the Interphase, Fatigue, and Mechanical Properties of Glass Fibre Reinforced Epoxy
Fibers 2019, 7(6), 55; https://doi.org/10.3390/fib7060055
Received: 30 March 2019 / Revised: 3 June 2019 / Accepted: 6 June 2019 / Published: 14 June 2019
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Abstract
Reliability and cost-effectiveness represent major challenges for the ongoing success of composites used in maritime applications. The development of large, load-bearing, and cyclically loaded structures, like rotor blades for wind or tidal energy turbines, requires consideration of environmental conditions in operation. In fact, [...] Read more.
Reliability and cost-effectiveness represent major challenges for the ongoing success of composites used in maritime applications. The development of large, load-bearing, and cyclically loaded structures, like rotor blades for wind or tidal energy turbines, requires consideration of environmental conditions in operation. In fact, the impact of moisture on composites cannot be neglected. As a result of difficult testing conditions, the knowledge concerning the influence of moisture on the fatigue life is limited. In this study, the impact of salt water on the fatigue behaviour of a glass fibre reinforced polymer (GFRP) has been investigated experimentally. To overcome the problem of invalid failure during fatigue testing, an improved specimen geometry has been developed. The results show a significant decrease in fatigue life for saturated GFRP specimens. In contrast, a water absorption of 50% of the maximum content showed no impact. This is especially remarkable because static material properties immediately decrease with the onset of moisture absorption. To identify the water absorption induced damage progress, light and scanning electron microscopy was used. As a result, the formation of debondings and cracks in the fibre–matrix interphase was detected in long-term conditioned specimens, although no mechanical loading was applied. Full article
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Open AccessEditorial
Editorial for Special Issue “Mineral Fibres”
Fibers 2019, 7(6), 54; https://doi.org/10.3390/fib7060054
Received: 9 June 2019 / Accepted: 11 June 2019 / Published: 13 June 2019
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Abstract
In the past 30 years, there has been a growing concern regarding the health risks of exposure to asbestos-containing materials (ACMs) and naturally occurring asbestos (NOA) [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mineral Fibres) Printed Edition available
Open AccessArticle
External Strengthening of Corrosion-Defected Beam–Column Members Using a CFRP Sheet
Fibers 2019, 7(6), 53; https://doi.org/10.3390/fib7060053
Received: 20 March 2019 / Revised: 4 May 2019 / Accepted: 21 May 2019 / Published: 7 June 2019
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Abstract
The efficiency of external strengthening using CFRP (Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer) sheets to rehabilitate corrosion-defected RC (Reinforced Concrete) beam–column members is experimentally studied. ALL specimens were tested under a combined axial force and transverse load until failure. The axial forces were applied with [...] Read more.
The efficiency of external strengthening using CFRP (Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer) sheets to rehabilitate corrosion-defected RC (Reinforced Concrete) beam–column members is experimentally studied. ALL specimens were tested under a combined axial force and transverse load until failure. The axial forces were applied with two levels either 25% or 50% of the ultimate design load of control specimen. The accelerated corrosion process was used to get steel reinforcement corrosion inside the concrete at three levels, 0% and approximately 5% and 20%, according to Faraday’s law. External strengthening with a CFRP sheet was used in this study to overcome the effect of deterioration in the mechanical properties of the corroded steel bars. A significant deterioration in the load carrying capacity, stiffness, and serviceability was recorded for corrosion-defected specimens. The increase of the axial force was recorded as a positive effect on the ultimate strength, stiffness, and serviceability of the testing specimens. This effect was clearly evident for the defected specimens, with an increasing corrosion level, by decreasing the adverse effects of corrosion. The external strengthening with a CFRP sheet restored the load-carrying capacity, stiffness, and serviceability to an undamaged state. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Grinding Test on Tremolite with Fibrous and Prismatic Habit
Fibers 2019, 7(6), 52; https://doi.org/10.3390/fib7060052
Received: 16 April 2019 / Revised: 13 May 2019 / Accepted: 20 May 2019 / Published: 1 June 2019
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Abstract
The main objective of this work is the evaluation of the morphology change in tremolite particles before and after a grinding process. The crushing action simulates anthropic alteration of the rock, such as excavation in rocks containing tremolite during a tunneling operation. The [...] Read more.
The main objective of this work is the evaluation of the morphology change in tremolite particles before and after a grinding process. The crushing action simulates anthropic alteration of the rock, such as excavation in rocks containing tremolite during a tunneling operation. The crystallization habit of these amphibolic minerals can exert hazardous effects on humans. The investigated amphibolic minerals are four tremolite samples, from the Piedmont and Aosta Valley regions, with different crystallization habits. The habits can be described as asbestiform (fibrous) for longer and thinner fibers and non-asbestiform (prismatic) for prismatic fragments, also known as “cleavage” fragments. In order to identify the morphological variation before and after the grinding, both a phase contrast optical microscope (PCOM) and a scanning electron microscope (SEM) were used. The identification procedure for fibrous and prismatic elements is related to a dimensional parameter (length–diameter ratio) defined by the Health and Safety Executive. The results highlight how mineral comminution leads to a rise of prismatic fragments and, therefore, to a potentially safer situation for worker and inhabitants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mineral Fibres) Printed Edition available
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Open AccessReview
Electrically Conductive Coatings for Fiber-Based E-Textiles
Fibers 2019, 7(6), 51; https://doi.org/10.3390/fib7060051
Received: 26 March 2019 / Revised: 17 May 2019 / Accepted: 22 May 2019 / Published: 1 June 2019
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Abstract
With the advent of wearable electronic devices in our daily lives, there is a need for soft, flexible, and conformable devices that can provide electronic capabilities without sacrificing comfort. Electronic textiles (e-textiles) combine electronic capabilities of devices such as sensors, actuators, energy harvesting [...] Read more.
With the advent of wearable electronic devices in our daily lives, there is a need for soft, flexible, and conformable devices that can provide electronic capabilities without sacrificing comfort. Electronic textiles (e-textiles) combine electronic capabilities of devices such as sensors, actuators, energy harvesting and storage devices, and communication devices with the comfort and conformability of conventional textiles. An important method to fabricate such devices is by coating conventionally used fibers and yarns with electrically conductive materials to create flexible capacitors, resistors, transistors, batteries, and circuits. Textiles constitute an obvious choice for deployment of such flexible electronic components due to their inherent conformability, strength, and stability. Coating a layer of electrically conducting material onto the textile can impart electronic capabilities to the base material in a facile manner. Such a coating can be done at any of the hierarchical levels of the textile structure, i.e., at the fiber, yarn, or fabric level. This review focuses on various electrically conducting materials and methods used for coating e-textile devices, as well as the different configurations that can be obtained from such coatings, creating a smart textile-based system. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Smart Coatings on Fibers and Textiles)
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Fibers EISSN 2079-6439 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
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