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Open AccessArticle

An Examination of Clinician Responses to Problem Gambling in Community Mental Health Services

1
Turning Point, Eastern Health, 110 Church Street, Richmond, VIC 3121, Australia
2
Monash Addiction Research Centre and Eastern Health Clinical School, Monash University, 5 Arnold St, Box Hill, VIC 3128, Australia
3
School of Psychology, Deakin University, 1 Gheringhap St, Geelong VIC 3220, Australia
4
Melbourne Graduate School of Education, University of Melbourne, Kwong Lee Dow Building, 234 Queensberry Street, Parkville, VIC 3053, Australia
5
School of Population Health, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, 216 Morrin Road, Auckland 1142, New Zealand
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9(7), 2075; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9072075
Received: 14 May 2020 / Revised: 26 June 2020 / Accepted: 29 June 2020 / Published: 1 July 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Clinical Psychology)
Gambling problems commonly co-occur with other mental health problems. However, screening for problem gambling (PG) rarely takes place within mental health treatment settings. The aim of the current study was to examine the way in which mental health clinicians respond to PG issues. Participants (n = 281) were recruited from a range of mental health services in Victoria, Australia. The majority of clinicians reported that at least some of their caseload was affected by gambling problems. Clinicians displayed moderate levels of knowledge about the reciprocal impact of gambling problems and mental health but had limited knowledge of screening tools to detect PG. Whilst 77% reported that they screened for PG, only 16% did so “often” or “always” and few expressed confidence in their ability to treat PG. However, only 12.5% reported receiving previous training in PG, and those that had, reported higher levels of knowledge about gambling in the context of mental illness, more positive attitudes about responding to gambling issues, and more confidence in detecting/screening for PG. In conclusion, the findings highlight the need to upskill mental health clinicians so they can better identify and manage PG and point towards opportunities for enhanced integrated working with gambling services. View Full-Text
Keywords: problem gambling; screening and assessment; comorbidity; clinician attitudes; clinical practice problem gambling; screening and assessment; comorbidity; clinician attitudes; clinical practice
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MDPI and ACS Style

Manning, V.; Dowling, N.A.; Rodda, S.N.; Cheetham, A.; Lubman, D.I. An Examination of Clinician Responses to Problem Gambling in Community Mental Health Services. J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9, 2075.

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