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Open AccessArticle

Pain Catastrophizing in Older Adults with Chronic Pain: The Mediator Effect of Mood Using a Path Analysis Approach

1
Pain and Rehabilitation Centre, and, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Linköping University, SE-581 85 Linköping, Sweden
2
Division of Health Care Analysis, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Linköping University, SE-581 85 Linköping, Sweden
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9(7), 2073; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9072073
Received: 2 June 2020 / Revised: 28 June 2020 / Accepted: 29 June 2020 / Published: 1 July 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Improved Rehabilitation for Patients with Chronic Pain)
Cognitive models of pain propose that catastrophic thinking is negatively associated with chronic pain. However, pain catastrophizing is a complex phenomenon requiring a multivariate examination. This study estimates the effects of mood variables (anxiety and depression) on pain catastrophizing in older adults with chronic pain. A postal survey addressing pain aspects was sent to 6611 people ≥ 65 years old living in south-eastern Sweden. Pain catastrophizing was measured using the pain catastrophizing scale. Anxiety and depression were assessed using two subscales of the general well-being schedule. Data were analysed using a path analysis approach. A total of 2790 respondents (76.2 ± 7.4 years old) reported chronic pain (≥three months). The mediation model accounted for 16.3% of anxiety, 17.1% of depression, and 30.9% of pain catastrophizing variances. Pain intensity, insomnia, number of comorbidities, and lifestyle factors (smoking, alcohol consumption, and weight) significantly affected both pain catastrophizing and mood. Anxiety (standardized path coefficient (bstd) = 0.324, p < 0.001) in comparison to depression (bstd = 0.125, p < 0.001) had a greater effect on pain catastrophizing. Mood mediated the relationship between pain catastrophizing and pain-related factors accounting for lifestyle and sociodemographic factors. View Full-Text
Keywords: pain catastrophizing; anxiety; depression; mediate; older people pain catastrophizing; anxiety; depression; mediate; older people
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MDPI and ACS Style

Dong, H.-J.; Gerdle, B.; Bernfort, L.; Levin, L.-Å.; Dragioti, E. Pain Catastrophizing in Older Adults with Chronic Pain: The Mediator Effect of Mood Using a Path Analysis Approach. J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9, 2073.

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