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Open AccessArticle

Vaccination Attitude and Communication in Early Settings: An Exploratory Study

1
Department of Medical Science and Public Health, University of Cagliari, University Campus of Monserrato, 09125 Cagliari, Italy
2
Sardegna, Regional Health Authority, 09123 Cagliari, Italy
3
Sardegna, Agency for Health Care, ASSL Nuoro, Via Piemonte, Macomer, 08015 Nuoro, Italy
4
Sardegna, Agency for Health Care, ASSL Cagliari, Via Sonnino, 09125 Cagliari, Italy
5
University Hospital of Cagliari, 09125 Cagliari, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Vaccines 2020, 8(4), 701; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines8040701
Received: 25 October 2020 / Revised: 14 November 2020 / Accepted: 19 November 2020 / Published: 20 November 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Strategies to Increase Vaccination Coverage and Vaccine Confidence)
Background: This study assesses attitudes towards vaccination in mothers of new-born babies and explores its association with different exposures to communication. Methods: Data were collected through questionnaires administered by means of interviews. Results: Data highlighted that 20% of mothers showed an orientation towards vaccine hesitancy. As for the reasons behind the attitude to vaccine hesitancy, data showed that concern is a common feature. As for the different exposures to communication, 49% of mothers did not remember having received or looked for any information about vaccination during pregnancy and post-partum; 25% stated they received information from several healthcare and non-healthcare sources; 26% declared having received or looked for information by means of healthcare and non-healthcare sources, as well as having taken part in a specific meeting during antenatal classes or at birth centres. The attitude towards vaccine hesitancy tends to reduce as exposure to different communication increases. Conclusions: This study supports the hypothesis that participation in interactive meetings in small groups focused on vaccination during the prenatal course or at the birth point may act as an enabling factor contributing to a decrease in the tendency to experience vaccine hesitation. View Full-Text
Keywords: vaccination attitude; vaccine hesitancy; new-born babies’ mothers; early communication; prenatal courses; birth centre vaccination attitude; vaccine hesitancy; new-born babies’ mothers; early communication; prenatal courses; birth centre
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MDPI and ACS Style

Mereu, N.; Mereu, A.; Murgia, A.; Liori, A.; Piga, M.; Argiolas, F.; Salis, G.; Santus, S.; Porcu, C.; Contu, P.; Sardu, C. Vaccination Attitude and Communication in Early Settings: An Exploratory Study. Vaccines 2020, 8, 701. https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines8040701

AMA Style

Mereu N, Mereu A, Murgia A, Liori A, Piga M, Argiolas F, Salis G, Santus S, Porcu C, Contu P, Sardu C. Vaccination Attitude and Communication in Early Settings: An Exploratory Study. Vaccines. 2020; 8(4):701. https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines8040701

Chicago/Turabian Style

Mereu, Noemi; Mereu, Alessandra; Murgia, Alessandra; Liori, Arianna; Piga, Michela; Argiolas, Federico; Salis, Graziella; Santus, Simonetta; Porcu, Carmela; Contu, Paolo; Sardu, Claudia. 2020. "Vaccination Attitude and Communication in Early Settings: An Exploratory Study" Vaccines 8, no. 4: 701. https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines8040701

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