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Phenolic Antioxidants in Aerial Parts of Wild Vaccinium Species: Towards Pharmaceutical and Biological Properties

1
Research Center for Studies of Food Quality and Agricultural Products, University of Agronomic Sciences and Veterinary Medicine of Bucharest, Marasti Blvd. No. 59, RO-011464 Bucharest, Romania
2
Faculty of Pharmacy, “George Emil Palade” University of Medicine, Pharmacy, Sciences and Technology of Târgu-Mures, Gh. Marinescu Street No. 38, RO-540139 Tîrgu Mures, Romania
3
Faculty of Biotechnology, University of Agronomic Sciences and Veterinary Medicine of Bucharest, Marasti Blvd. No. 59, RO-011464 Bucharest, Romania
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors share the first authorship.
Antioxidants 2019, 8(12), 649; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox8120649
Received: 18 November 2019 / Revised: 10 December 2019 / Accepted: 12 December 2019 / Published: 16 December 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Phenolic Profiling and Antioxidant Capacity in Plants)
Phenolic compounds are a widespread group of secondary metabolites found in all plants, representing the most desirable antioxidants due to their potential to be used as additives in the food industry (inhibition of lipid oxidation), and in cosmetology and medicine (protection against oxidative stress). In recent years, demand for the identification of edible sources rich in phenolic antioxidants, as well as the development of new natural plant products to be used as dietary supplements or pharmaceuticals, has been a great preoccupation. At present, from the “circular economy” perspective, there is an increased interest to use agricultural waste resources to produce high-value compounds. Vaccinium leaves and stems are considered essentially an agro-waste of the berry industry. Scientific studies have shown that phenolic compounds were found in a markedly higher content in the leaves and stems of Vaccinium plants than in the fruits, in agreement with the strongest biological and antioxidant activities displayed by these aerial parts compared to fruits. This paper aims to review the current state of the art regarding the phenolic antioxidants from leaves and stems of two wild Vaccinium species, bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus L.) and lingonberry (Vaccinium vitis-idaea L.), as promising natural resources with pharmaceutical and biological activity. View Full-Text
Keywords: polyphenols; antioxidants; Vaccinium; leaves; stems; natural resources; pharmaceutical products polyphenols; antioxidants; Vaccinium; leaves; stems; natural resources; pharmaceutical products
MDPI and ACS Style

Bujor, O.-C.; Tanase, C.; Popa, M.E. Phenolic Antioxidants in Aerial Parts of Wild Vaccinium Species: Towards Pharmaceutical and Biological Properties. Antioxidants 2019, 8, 649.

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