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Article

Neuromodulatory Control and Language Recovery in Bilingual Aphasia: An Active Inference Approach

1
Wellcome Centre for Human Neuroimaging, University College London, 12 Queen Square, London WC1N 3AR, UK
2
Experimental Psychology, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Behav. Sci. 2020, 10(10), 161; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs10100161
Received: 20 September 2020 / Revised: 17 October 2020 / Accepted: 19 October 2020 / Published: 21 October 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bilingual Aphasia)
Understanding the aetiology of the diverse recovery patterns in bilingual aphasia is a theoretical challenge with implications for treatment. Loss of control over intact language networks provides a parsimonious starting point that can be tested using in-silico lesions. We simulated a complex recovery pattern (alternate antagonism and paradoxical translation) to test the hypothesis—from an established hierarchical control model—that loss of control was mediated by constraints on neuromodulatory resources. We used active (Bayesian) inference to simulate a selective loss of sensory precision; i.e., confidence in the causes of sensations. This in-silico lesion altered the precision of beliefs about task relevant states, including appropriate actions, and reproduced exactly the recovery pattern of interest. As sensory precision has been linked to acetylcholine release, these simulations endorse the conjecture that loss of neuromodulatory control can explain this atypical recovery pattern. We discuss the relevance of this finding for other recovery patterns. View Full-Text
Keywords: bilingual aphasia; active inference; generative models; simulation; in-silico lesions; neuromodulatory control; language recovery patterns; alternate antagonism; paradoxical translation bilingual aphasia; active inference; generative models; simulation; in-silico lesions; neuromodulatory control; language recovery patterns; alternate antagonism; paradoxical translation
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MDPI and ACS Style

Sajid, N.; Friston, K.J.; Ekert, J.O.; Price, C.J.; Green, D.W. Neuromodulatory Control and Language Recovery in Bilingual Aphasia: An Active Inference Approach. Behav. Sci. 2020, 10, 161. https://doi.org/10.3390/bs10100161

AMA Style

Sajid N, Friston KJ, Ekert JO, Price CJ, Green DW. Neuromodulatory Control and Language Recovery in Bilingual Aphasia: An Active Inference Approach. Behavioral Sciences. 2020; 10(10):161. https://doi.org/10.3390/bs10100161

Chicago/Turabian Style

Sajid, Noor, Karl J. Friston, Justyna O. Ekert, Cathy J. Price, and David W. Green. 2020. "Neuromodulatory Control and Language Recovery in Bilingual Aphasia: An Active Inference Approach" Behavioral Sciences 10, no. 10: 161. https://doi.org/10.3390/bs10100161

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