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Editorial

The COVID-19 Pandemic Can Impact Perinatal Mental Health and the Health of the Offspring

1
Department of Nursing, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Granada, 18071 Granada, Spain
2
Mind, Brain, and Behavior Research Center (CIMCYC), University of Granada, 18011 Granada, Spain
3
Center for Research in Neuropsychology and Cognitive Behavioral Intervention, Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, University of Coimbra, 3000-115 Coimbra, Portugal
4
Department of Legal Medicine, Psychiatry and Pathology, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid, Spain
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Behav. Sci. 2020, 10(11), 162; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs10110162
Received: 9 September 2020 / Accepted: 20 October 2020 / Published: 23 October 2020
The COVID-19 ongoing pandemic constitutes a major challenge for countries throughout the world due to the rapid spread of SARS-CoV-2 and devastating consequences in health. No one is free from COVID-19 impact. In this regard, pregnant women are not the exception. The COVID-19 outbreak represents a massive source of stressful agents for women and their babies during the perinatal period. The COVID-19 pandemic has been suggested to potentially have short- and long-term detrimental effects on pregnant women and the baby. These adverse consequences range from mental to medical diseases. During the last centuries, several dreadful and fatal incidents have put pregnant women and their babies at higher risk of mortality and health deterioration. For example, it has been informed that women exposed to the 1918 flu pandemic (commonly known as the Spanish flu) while pregnant showed higher rates of premature delivery in the short term. Long-term consequences have also been reported and individuals (both males and females) who were exposed to the 1918 flu pandemic while in utero had a higher risk of developing schizophrenia, diabetes, coronary heart disease or cancer throughout their lifespan. View Full-Text
Keywords: prenatal stress; antenatal stress; psychological stress; psychological well-bieng; physiological stress; cortisol; pregnancy; COVID-19; SARS-Co-2; offspring; neonate prenatal stress; antenatal stress; psychological stress; psychological well-bieng; physiological stress; cortisol; pregnancy; COVID-19; SARS-Co-2; offspring; neonate
MDPI and ACS Style

Caparros-Gonzalez, R.A.; Ganho-Ávila, A.; Torre-Luque, A.d.l. The COVID-19 Pandemic Can Impact Perinatal Mental Health and the Health of the Offspring. Behav. Sci. 2020, 10, 162. https://doi.org/10.3390/bs10110162

AMA Style

Caparros-Gonzalez RA, Ganho-Ávila A, Torre-Luque Adl. The COVID-19 Pandemic Can Impact Perinatal Mental Health and the Health of the Offspring. Behavioral Sciences. 2020; 10(11):162. https://doi.org/10.3390/bs10110162

Chicago/Turabian Style

Caparros-Gonzalez, Rafael A., Ana Ganho-Ávila, and Alejandro d.l. Torre-Luque. 2020. "The COVID-19 Pandemic Can Impact Perinatal Mental Health and the Health of the Offspring" Behavioral Sciences 10, no. 11: 162. https://doi.org/10.3390/bs10110162

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