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Med. Sci., Volume 5, Issue 1 (March 2017) – 5 articles

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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
A Prospective Randomized Trial of Postural Changes vs Passive Supine Lying during the Second Stage of Labor under Epidural Analgesia
Med. Sci. 2017, 5(1), 5; https://doi.org/10.3390/medsci5010005 - 08 Mar 2017
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2208
Abstract
There exist very few studies comparing different postures or postural changes during labor in parturients with epidural analgesia. Aim: To disclose whether the intervention of a multidisciplinary nursing team including a physiotherapist during the second stage of labor improves the obstetric outcome in [...] Read more.
There exist very few studies comparing different postures or postural changes during labor in parturients with epidural analgesia. Aim: To disclose whether the intervention of a multidisciplinary nursing team including a physiotherapist during the second stage of labor improves the obstetric outcome in parturients with epidural analgesia. Design: Prospective randomized trial. Setting: University-affiliated hospital. Population: Women undergoing labor with epidural analgesia after a normal gestation. Methods: 150 women were randomized either to actively perform predefined postural changes during the passive phase of the second stage of labor under the guidance of the attending physiotherapist (study group), or to carry out the whole second stage of labor lying in the traditional supine position (control group). Results: There were significantly more eutocic deliveries (p = 0.005) and, conversely, significantly less instrumental deliveries (p < 0.05) and cesarean sections (p < 0.05) in the study group. The total duration of the second stage of labor was significantly shorter (p < 0.01) in the study group. This was at the expense of the passive phase of the second stage of labor (p < 0.01). Significantly less episiotomies were performed in the study group (31.2% vs 17.8%, p < 0.05). Conclusion: The intervention of a physiotherapist during the second stage of labor significantly improved the obstetric outcome. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Nursing Research)
Open AccessCorrection
Correction: Hasona, N.A. and Elasbali, A. Evaluation of Electrolytes Imbalance and Dyslipidemia in Diabetic Patients. Med. Sci. 2016, 4, 7
Med. Sci. 2017, 5(1), 4; https://doi.org/10.3390/medsci5010004 - 22 Jan 2017
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1396
Abstract
The authors wish to make the following correction to their paper [1]. In the discussion section, the sentence “Regarding the lipid profile, the present results revealed a significant increase (p < 0.001) in the serum levels of cholesterol, triglycerides and HDL-cholesterol in [...] Read more.
The authors wish to make the following correction to their paper [1]. In the discussion section, the sentence “Regarding the lipid profile, the present results revealed a significant increase (p < 0.001) in the serum levels of cholesterol, triglycerides and HDL-cholesterol in all diabetics relative to all non-diabetic subjects”. This should be changed to “Regarding the lipid profile, the present results revealed a significant increase (p < 0.001) in the serum levels of cholesterol and triglycerides and a significant decrease in HDL-cholesterol in all diabetics relative to all non-diabetic subjects”.[...] Full article
Open AccessEditorial
Acknowledgement to Reviewers of Medical Sciences in 2016
Med. Sci. 2017, 5(1), 3; https://doi.org/10.3390/medsci5010003 - 13 Jan 2017
Viewed by 1487
Abstract
The editors of Medical Sciences would like to express their sincere gratitude to the following reviewers for assessing manuscripts in 2016.[...] Full article
Open AccessArticle
HLA Typing and Celiac Disease in Moroccans
Med. Sci. 2017, 5(1), 2; https://doi.org/10.3390/medsci5010002 - 06 Jan 2017
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2539
Abstract
Genetic and environmental factors are responsible for differences in the prevalence of some diseases across countries. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) allele frequencies in North African populations show some differences in their distribution compared to Europeans, Mediterraneans, and sub-Saharans, and some specific alleles and [...] Read more.
Genetic and environmental factors are responsible for differences in the prevalence of some diseases across countries. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) allele frequencies in North African populations show some differences in their distribution compared to Europeans, Mediterraneans, and sub-Saharans, and some specific alleles and haplotypes could be clinically relevant. Celiac disease (CD) has been fast increasing in prevalence in North Africa; but few immunogenetic data are available for this area, in which a high prevalence of the disease has been described. In this report, we assess and discuss results of HLA class II (HLA-DQA1/DQB1/DRB1) typing in Moroccan patients with CD and compare them with a control population from Morocco—genetically well characterized—and with other North African, Mediterranean, and European populations. The classical HLA-DQ associations were confirmed in Moroccans with CD. The high frequency of DQ2.5 homozygosity (45.2%) found in Moroccans with CD was noteworthy as compared with other populations (23%–32%). The genetic risk gradient for CD, identified by previous studies, has been confirmed in Moroccans with some differences, mainly concerning DQ8 genotypes. This study provides the immunogenetic framework of CD in Moroccans and confirms the need to learn more about associations with additional HLA and non-HLA genetic factors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Genetics of Celiac Disease)
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Open AccessArticle
A Comparative Evaluation of Gait between Children with Autism and Typically Developing Matched Controls
Med. Sci. 2017, 5(1), 1; https://doi.org/10.3390/medsci5010001 - 05 Jan 2017
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 3553
Abstract
Anecdotal reports suggest children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) ambulate differently than peers with typical development (TD). Little empirical evidence supports these reports. Children with ASD exhibit delayed motor skills, and it is important to determine whether or not motor movement deficits exist [...] Read more.
Anecdotal reports suggest children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) ambulate differently than peers with typical development (TD). Little empirical evidence supports these reports. Children with ASD exhibit delayed motor skills, and it is important to determine whether or not motor movement deficits exist during walking. The purpose of the study was to perform a comprehensive lower-extremity gait analysis between children (aged 5–12 years) with ASD and age- and gender-matched-samples with TD. Gait parameters were normalized to 101 data points and the gait cycle was divided into seven sub-phases. The Model Statistic procedure was used to test for statistical significance between matched-pairs throughout the entire gait cycle for each parameter. When collapsed across all participants, children with ASD exhibited large numbers of significant differences (p < 0.05) throughout the gait cycle in hip, knee, and ankle joint positions as well as vertical and anterior/posterior ground reaction forces. Children with ASD exhibited unique differences throughout the gait cycle, which supports current literature on the heterogeneity of the disorder. The present work supports recent findings that motor movement differences may be a core symptom of ASD. Thus, individuals may benefit from therapeutic movement interventions that follow precision medicine guidelines by accounting for individual characteristics, given the unique movement differences observed. Full article
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