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Open AccessArticle

Effect of a Diet Supplemented with Malic Acid–Heat (MAH) Treated Sunflower on Carcass Characteristics, Meat Composition and Fatty Acids Profile in Growing Lambs

1
Departamento de Producción Agraria, ETSIAAB, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria, 28040 Madrid, Spain
2
Departamento de Producción Animal, Facultad de Veterinaria, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Avda. Puerta de Hierro, s/n. 28040 Madrid, Spain
3
Department of Food Technology, Instituto Nacional de Investigación y Tecnología Agraria y Alimentaria—INIA, Ctra de la Coruña km 7.5, 28040 Madrid, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Animals 2020, 10(3), 487; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani10030487
Received: 30 January 2020 / Revised: 4 March 2020 / Accepted: 12 March 2020 / Published: 15 March 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Small Ruminant Nutrition and Metabolism)
One of the main objectives of animal nutrition is to optimize the production of the animals in order to obtain good-quality products, but decreasing the environmental pollution caused by livestock production has also become a priority in the last years. Compared to other farm animals, ruminants have low N utilization efficiency that is mainly due to the inefficient use of nitrogen (N) in the rumen and a large portion of the ingested N is excreted causing environmental problems such as water and soil eutrophication. In this study we analyzed the influence of feeding sunflower seeds (SS) and meal (SM) subjected to a combined malic acid–heat treatment (MAH) on carcass characteristics and meat composition and fatty acid profile of growing lambs. The MAH treatment was applied to reduce ruminal degradation of SS and SM protein and therefore N losses. Compared to control-fed lambs, animals fed the treated SS and SM had increased dorsal fat thickness and yellowness and chromaticity of the Rectus abdominis muscle, which might be beneficial for consumers’ acceptance as they associate a bright meat color with meat freshness and quality. However, there were no differences between groups in meat chemical composition and fatty acid profile.
The objective of the study was to assess the effects of feeding sunflower meal (SM) and seeds (SS) protected against rumen degradation on carcass characteristics and composition and fatty acid (FA) profile of lamb meat. The protection of SM and SS was achieved by treating both feeds with malic acid at 150 °C for 2 h (MAH treatment) and in a previous study this treatment was shown to decrease ruminal degradability of protein of both feeds and fat degradability of SS. Two homogeneous groups of 12 lambs each were fed ad libitum high-cereal concentrates and cereal straw from 14 to 26 kg of body weight. The two concentrates differed only in the treatment SM and SS, which were included either untreated (control) or MAH treated. The MAH-fed lambs had greater thickness of dorsal fat (p = 0.016) and greater (p ≤ 0.016) values of the color parameters a* (redness) and C* (chromaticity) of the Rectus abdominis muscle. However, there were no differences in carcass measurements and in water-holding capacity, chemical composition, pH, color, or fatty acid of Longissimus muscle. In summary, the MAH treatment resulted in only subtle changes in meat composition and quality. View Full-Text
Keywords: meat quality; lambs; sunflower seeds and meal; fatty acid profile meat quality; lambs; sunflower seeds and meal; fatty acid profile
MDPI and ACS Style

Haro, A.; de Evan, T.; De La Fuente Vázquez, J.; Díaz, M.T.; González Cano, J.; Carro, M.D. Effect of a Diet Supplemented with Malic Acid–Heat (MAH) Treated Sunflower on Carcass Characteristics, Meat Composition and Fatty Acids Profile in Growing Lambs. Animals 2020, 10, 487.

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