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Open AccessArticle

The Effect of Hydrogen on Pore Formation in Aluminum Alloy Castings: Myth Versus Reality

Jacksonville University; Jacksonville, FL 32211, USA
Metals 2020, 10(3), 368; https://doi.org/10.3390/met10030368
Received: 17 February 2020 / Revised: 6 March 2020 / Accepted: 9 March 2020 / Published: 12 March 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dedicating to Professor John Campbell's 80th Birthday)
The solubility of hydrogen in liquid and solid aluminum is reviewed. Based on classical nucleation theory, it is shown that pores cannot nucleate either homogeneously or heterogeneously in liquid aluminum. Results of in situ studies on pore formation show that pores appear at low hydrogen supersaturation levels, bypassing nucleation completely. The results are explained based on the bifilm theory introduced by Prof. John Campbell, as this theory is currently the most appropriate, and most likely, the only mechanism for pores to form. Examples for the effect of hydrogen on pore formation are given by using extreme data from the literature. It is concluded that a fundamental change in how hydrogen is viewed is needed in aluminum casting industry. View Full-Text
Keywords: supersaturation; fracture pressure; nucleation; bifilm theory; John Campbell supersaturation; fracture pressure; nucleation; bifilm theory; John Campbell
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Tiryakioğlu, M. The Effect of Hydrogen on Pore Formation in Aluminum Alloy Castings: Myth Versus Reality. Metals 2020, 10, 368.

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