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Open AccessArticle

A Silicocarbonatitic Melt and Spinel-Bearing Dunite of Crustal Origin at the Parker Phlogopite Mine, Notre-Dame-du-Laus, Quebec, Canada

1
Department of Earth and Planetary Science, McGill University, 3450 University Street, Montreal, QC H3A 0E8, Canada
2
Fibics Incorporated, 1431 Merivale Road, Ottawa, ON K2E 0B9, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Minerals 2019, 9(10), 613; https://doi.org/10.3390/min9100613
Received: 30 August 2019 / Revised: 30 September 2019 / Accepted: 3 October 2019 / Published: 6 October 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Minerals of the Southern Grenville Province)
The Parker phlogopite mine, located near Notre-Dame-du-Laus, Quebec, 74 km north of Ottawa, is well known among mineral collectors for its centimetric euhedral crystals of black spinel. Among the dozens of phlogopite mines active in the early 1900s in the Mont-Laurier–Bancroft corridor in the Central Metasedimentary Belt of the Grenville Province, the Parker mine is exceptional because of the association of forsterite + spinel with phlogopite. Euhedral crystals of these minerals are found “frozen” in a carbonate matrix. The carbonate dike and segregations are associated with spinel-rich dunite that contains accessory diopside, phlogopite, and pargasite, as well as ilmenite and apatite. The interstitial melt crystallized to calcite + dolomite. Hematite appeared as flakes in the melt owing to net loss of hydrogen, and the spinel underwent oxidation-induced exsolution. Our spinel crystal entrapped a domain of carbonate during growth. It also entrapped globules of boundary-layer melt that crystallized to a carbonate + sulfate + phosphate + silicate + oxide assemblage. Such globules, where present in the cumulate, are more pristine than in the coarse crystal of spinel, i.e., less affected by a hydrothermal overprint. We contend that the carbonate melt ultimately formed by the hydrous melting of marble, as supported by oxygen-isotope data on all major minerals. Melting occurred 1140 million years ago, at a time of tectonic relaxation following the Shawinigan compressive stresses. View Full-Text
Keywords: spinel; forsterite; phlogopite; silicocarbonatite dike; dunite; polymineralic globules; late oxidation; Parker mine; Notre-Dame-du-Laus; Quebec; Canada spinel; forsterite; phlogopite; silicocarbonatite dike; dunite; polymineralic globules; late oxidation; Parker mine; Notre-Dame-du-Laus; Quebec; Canada
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Martin, R.F.; Schumann, D. A Silicocarbonatitic Melt and Spinel-Bearing Dunite of Crustal Origin at the Parker Phlogopite Mine, Notre-Dame-du-Laus, Quebec, Canada. Minerals 2019, 9, 613.

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