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Article

The Importance of Food Pulses in Benthic-Pelagic Coupling Processes of Passive Suspension Feeders

by 1,2,3,* and 4
1
DiSTeBA, Università del Salento, 73100 Lecce, Italy
2
CONISMA—Consorzio Nazionale Interuniversitario per le Scienze del Mare, 00196 Rome, Italy
3
Labomar, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, CE 60165-081, Brazil
4
Dipartimento di Ecologia Marina Integrata, Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn, 80121 Napoli, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Epaminondas D. Christou
Water 2021, 13(7), 997; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13070997
Received: 27 February 2021 / Revised: 24 March 2021 / Accepted: 31 March 2021 / Published: 4 April 2021
Benthic-pelagic coupling processes and the quantity of carbon transferred from the water column to the benthic suspension feeders need multiple intensive sampling approaches where several environmental variables and benthos performance are quantified. Here, activity, dietary composition, and capture rates of three Mediterranean gorgonians (Paramuricea clavata, Eunicella singularis, and Leptogorgia sarmentosa) were assessed in an intensive cycle considering different variables such as the seston concentration and quality (e.g., carbon, nitrogen, and zooplankton), the colony branch patterns, and the energetic input of the single species (i.e., mixotrophic and heterotrophic). The three species showed clear differences in their impact on the seston concentration. Paramuricea clavata, the most densely distributed, showed a greater impact on the near bottom water column seston. The lowest impact of E. singularis on the seston could be explained by its mixotrophy and colony branching pattern. Leptogorgia sarmentosa had a similar impact as E. singularis, having a much more complex branching pattern and more than an order of magnitude smaller number of colonies per meter square than the other two octocorals. The amount of carbon ingested in the peaks of the capture rates in the three species may cover a non-neglectable proportion of the potential carbon fluxes. View Full-Text
Keywords: prey capture rates; octocorals; marine animal forest; optimum forage theory; carbon immobilization; zooplankton; seston prey capture rates; octocorals; marine animal forest; optimum forage theory; carbon immobilization; zooplankton; seston
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MDPI and ACS Style

Rossi, S.; Rizzo, L. The Importance of Food Pulses in Benthic-Pelagic Coupling Processes of Passive Suspension Feeders. Water 2021, 13, 997. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13070997

AMA Style

Rossi S, Rizzo L. The Importance of Food Pulses in Benthic-Pelagic Coupling Processes of Passive Suspension Feeders. Water. 2021; 13(7):997. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13070997

Chicago/Turabian Style

Rossi, Sergio; Rizzo, Lucia. 2021. "The Importance of Food Pulses in Benthic-Pelagic Coupling Processes of Passive Suspension Feeders" Water 13, no. 7: 997. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13070997

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