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Article

Downstream State and Water Security in the Mekong Region: A Case of Cambodia between Too Much and Too Little Water

Faculty of Development Studies, Royal University of Phnom Penh, Phnom Penh 12156, Cambodia
Academic Editor: Hemant Ojha
Water 2021, 13(6), 802; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13060802
Received: 29 December 2020 / Revised: 23 February 2021 / Accepted: 1 March 2021 / Published: 15 March 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Managing Climate Risks to Water Security)
Cambodia has too much water during the wet season, and too little water remains in the dry season, which drives a relentless cycle of floods and droughts. These extremes destroy crops, properties, infrastructure, and lives and contribute to poverty. Thus, water management is key to the development of Cambodia. This article seeks to answer the question why Cambodia is vulnerable to floods and drought and how these conditions undermine the country’s development. It also examines what can be done to improve the country’s water resource management and the livelihoods of its population. The article examines water resource availability in Cambodia, its management regimes, and the policy implications in answering these research questions. The article looks at three case studies: first, the Stung Chreybak irrigation scheme in the Tonle Sap region; second, the Lower Sesan 2 Dam (LS2) in the Sesan, Srepok, and Sekong (3S) basin in Cambodia; and third, the transboundary water management in the Mekong Delta. It concludes that water management has been equated to irrigation management. However, the irrigation system in Cambodia has been inadequate to cope with the tremendous volume of water. Furthermore, water management has been complicated by the hydropower dams in the Upper Mekong region and the rubber dams in Vietnam’s Mekong Delta. These contribute to high water insecurity in Cambodia. View Full-Text
Keywords: water security; hydropower; irrigation; flood; drought; Mekong Delta water security; hydropower; irrigation; flood; drought; Mekong Delta
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MDPI and ACS Style

Sithirith, M. Downstream State and Water Security in the Mekong Region: A Case of Cambodia between Too Much and Too Little Water. Water 2021, 13, 802. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13060802

AMA Style

Sithirith M. Downstream State and Water Security in the Mekong Region: A Case of Cambodia between Too Much and Too Little Water. Water. 2021; 13(6):802. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13060802

Chicago/Turabian Style

Sithirith, Mak. 2021. "Downstream State and Water Security in the Mekong Region: A Case of Cambodia between Too Much and Too Little Water" Water 13, no. 6: 802. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13060802

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