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Open AccessArticle

A Novel Approach to Improving Fat Delivery in Neonatal Enteral Feeding

1
Department of Bioengineering, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005, USA
2
Department of Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA
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Beyond Traditional Borders, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005, USA
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Department of Medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX 75235, USA
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Department of Medicine, Imperial College London, London W12 0NN, UK
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School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
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Section of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, The University of Texas at Austin Dell Medical School, Austin, TX 77030, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Nutrients 2015, 7(6), 5051-5064; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu7065051
Received: 5 May 2015 / Revised: 25 May 2015 / Accepted: 8 June 2015 / Published: 23 June 2015
Continuous infusion systems used for enteral nutrition support in the neonatal intensive care unit deliver as little as 60% of the fat in human milk to the neonate. This study determined the effect of mixing common feedings for preterm infants in the feeding bag and tubing on fat losses during enteral feeding. Laboratory models were developed to assess the contribution of various mixing techniques to delivered fat content. Fat content was measured periodically during feeding and compared to baseline measurements. A multistage approach incorporating a feeding bag inverter and a tubing circulation loop delivered >90% of milk fat when used in conjunction with a commercial continuous infusion system. With unfortified human milk, this approach delivered 91.9% ± 1.5% of fat content over a one hour feed, significantly greater (p < 0.01) than 77.5% ± 2.2% delivered by continuous infusion controls (Mean ± SEM). With fortified human milk, this approach delivered 92.1% ± 2.4% of fat content, significantly greater (p < 0.01) than 79.4% ± 1.0% delivered by a non-adapted infusion system (Mean ± SEM). Mixing human milk during continuous infusion improves fat delivery, which may improve nutrition and growth outcomes in low birth weight neonates. View Full-Text
Keywords: enteral nutrition; breast milk; human milk-derived fortifier; very low birth weight; neonates; neonatal intensive care units; nutriflow enteral nutrition; breast milk; human milk-derived fortifier; very low birth weight; neonates; neonatal intensive care units; nutriflow
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Jarjour, J.; Juarez, A.M.; Kocak, D.K.; Liu, N.J.; Tabata, M.M.; Hawthorne, K.M.; Ramos, R.F.; Abrams, S.A. A Novel Approach to Improving Fat Delivery in Neonatal Enteral Feeding. Nutrients 2015, 7, 5051-5064.

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