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Review

Potential of Moringa oleifera to Improve Glucose Control for the Prevention of Diabetes and Related Metabolic Alterations: A Systematic Review of Animal and Human Studies

1
Immunonutrition Research Group, Department of Metabolism and Nutrition, Institute of Food Science and Technology and Nutrition (ICTAN)—CSIC, C/Jose Antonio Novais 10, 28040 Madrid, Spain
2
Department of Nursery, Physiotherapy and Occupational Therapy, Faculty of Nursery, University of Castilla-La Mancha, 160071 Cuenca, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(7), 2050; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12072050
Received: 2 June 2020 / Revised: 1 July 2020 / Accepted: 7 July 2020 / Published: 10 July 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Application of Immunonutrient in Human Health and Disease)
Moringa oleifera (MO) is a multipurpose plant consumed as food and known for its medicinal uses, among others. Leaves, seeds and pods are the main parts used as food or food supplements. Nutritionally rich and with a high polyphenol content in the form of phenolic acids, flavonoids and glucosinolates, MO has been shown to exert numerous in vitro activities and in vivo effects, including hypoglycemic activity. A systematic search was carried out in the PubMed database and reference lists on the effects of MO on glucose metabolism. Thirty-three animal studies and eight human studies were included. Water and organic solvent extracts of leaves and, secondly, seeds, have been extensively assayed in animal models, showing the hypoglycemic effect, both under acute conditions and in long-term administrations and also prevention of other metabolic changes and complications associated to the hyperglycemic status. In humans, clinical trials are scarce, with variable designs and testing mainly dry leaf powder alone or mixed with other foods or MO aqueous preparations. Although the reported results are encouraging, especially those from postprandial studies, more human studies are certainly needed with more stringent inclusion criteria and a sufficient number of diabetic or prediabetic subjects. Moreover, trying to quantify the bioactive substances administered with the experimental material tested would facilitate comparison between studies. View Full-Text
Keywords: Moringa oleifera; diabetes mellitus; fasting glucose; glucose tolerance; antioxidant enzymes; lipid metabolism; animal studies; human studies Moringa oleifera; diabetes mellitus; fasting glucose; glucose tolerance; antioxidant enzymes; lipid metabolism; animal studies; human studies
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MDPI and ACS Style

Nova, E.; Redondo-Useros, N.; Martínez-García, R.M.; Gómez-Martínez, S.; Díaz-Prieto, L.E.; Marcos, A. Potential of Moringa oleifera to Improve Glucose Control for the Prevention of Diabetes and Related Metabolic Alterations: A Systematic Review of Animal and Human Studies. Nutrients 2020, 12, 2050. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12072050

AMA Style

Nova E, Redondo-Useros N, Martínez-García RM, Gómez-Martínez S, Díaz-Prieto LE, Marcos A. Potential of Moringa oleifera to Improve Glucose Control for the Prevention of Diabetes and Related Metabolic Alterations: A Systematic Review of Animal and Human Studies. Nutrients. 2020; 12(7):2050. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12072050

Chicago/Turabian Style

Nova, Esther, Noemí Redondo-Useros, Rosa M. Martínez-García, Sonia Gómez-Martínez, Ligia E. Díaz-Prieto, and Ascensión Marcos. 2020. "Potential of Moringa oleifera to Improve Glucose Control for the Prevention of Diabetes and Related Metabolic Alterations: A Systematic Review of Animal and Human Studies" Nutrients 12, no. 7: 2050. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12072050

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