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Review

Human Milk Feeding and Preterm Infants’ Growth and Body Composition: A Literature Review

1
Department of Clinical Sciences and Community Health, University of Milan, 20122 Milan, Italy
2
Fondazione IRCCS Ca’ Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Pediatric Intermediate Care Unit, 20122 Milan, Italy
3
Fondazione IRCCS Ca’ Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, NICU, 20122 Milan, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Jacopo Cerasani and Federica Ceroni have contributed equally.
Nutrients 2020, 12(4), 1155; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12041155
Received: 21 March 2020 / Revised: 14 April 2020 / Accepted: 17 April 2020 / Published: 21 April 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition for Infant Feeding)
Preterm infants may show a higher risk of adverse health outcomes, such as the development of metabolic syndrome and cognitive impairment. The most recent evidence highlights that nutrition, body composition development, and early postnatal growth may play a role in the programming of these processes. Human milk feeding has been recommended as the natural feeding for preterm infants and as a cost-effective strategy for reducing disease and economic burden. Considering that the postnatal growth retardation and aberrant body composition shown by preterm infants at the time of hospital discharge still remain important issues, we performed a literature review, aiming to provide an update about the effect of human milk feeding on these processes. On the basis of our findings, human milk feeding in preterm infants, although related to a slower weight gain than formula feeding, is associated with a better recovery of body composition through the promotion of fat-free mass deposition, which may ultimately lead to better metabolic and neurodevelopmental outcomes. Promotion and support of human milk feeding should be considered a priority in preterm infants’ care. View Full-Text
Keywords: human milk feeding; growth; body composition; preterm infant human milk feeding; growth; body composition; preterm infant
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MDPI and ACS Style

Cerasani, J.; Ceroni, F.; De Cosmi, V.; Mazzocchi, A.; Morniroli, D.; Roggero, P.; Mosca, F.; Agostoni, C.; Giannì, M.L. Human Milk Feeding and Preterm Infants’ Growth and Body Composition: A Literature Review. Nutrients 2020, 12, 1155. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12041155

AMA Style

Cerasani J, Ceroni F, De Cosmi V, Mazzocchi A, Morniroli D, Roggero P, Mosca F, Agostoni C, Giannì ML. Human Milk Feeding and Preterm Infants’ Growth and Body Composition: A Literature Review. Nutrients. 2020; 12(4):1155. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12041155

Chicago/Turabian Style

Cerasani, Jacopo, Federica Ceroni, Valentina De Cosmi, Alessandra Mazzocchi, Daniela Morniroli, Paola Roggero, Fabio Mosca, Carlo Agostoni, and Maria Lorella Giannì. 2020. "Human Milk Feeding and Preterm Infants’ Growth and Body Composition: A Literature Review" Nutrients 12, no. 4: 1155. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12041155

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