Next Article in Journal
Serum Uric Acid-Lowering Effects of Combined Glycine and Tryptophan Treatments in Subjects with Mild Hyperuricemia: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Crossover Study
Previous Article in Journal
“The One Time You Have Control over What They Eat”: A Qualitative Exploration of Mothers’ Practices to Establish Healthy Eating Behaviours during Weaning
Open AccessArticle

Total, Fresh, Lean, and Fresh Lean Beef Consumption in Relation to Nutrient Intakes and Diet Quality among U.S. Adults, 2005–2016

1
Department of Kinesiology and Community Health, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL 61820, USA
2
Brown School, Washington University in St. Louis, MO 63130, USA
3
Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Division of Nutritional Sciences, University of Illinois Extension, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, IL 61820, USA
4
College of Applied Health Sciences, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL 61820, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2019, 11(3), 563; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11030563
Received: 22 January 2019 / Revised: 19 February 2019 / Accepted: 26 February 2019 / Published: 6 March 2019
(1) Background: This study assessed the influence of beef consumption on nutrient intakes and diet quality among U.S. adults. (2) Methods: Nationally-representative sample (n = 27,117) from 2005–2016 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey was analyzed. First-difference estimator addressed confounding bias from time-invariant unobservables (e.g., eating habits, taste preferences) by using within-individual variations in beef consumption between 2 nonconsecutive 24 h dietary recalls. (3) Results: Approximately 54%, 39%, 12%, and 7% of U.S. adults consumed beef, lean beef, fresh beef, and fresh lean beef, respectively. Overall diet quality measured by the Health Eating Index-2015 (HEI-2015) score among beef, fresh beef, lean beef, and fresh lean beef consumers was lower than beef non-consumers. Regression analyses found that beef, fresh beef, lean beef, and fresh lean beef consumption was associated with higher daily intakes of total energy, protein, sodium, choline, iron, selenium, zinc, phosphorus, and multiple B vitamins. Beef, fresh beef, and lean beef consumption but not fresh lean beef consumption was associated with higher saturated fat intake. Beef consumption was not found to be associated with overall dietary quality measured by the HEI-2015 score. (4) Conclusions: Beef consumers may increase the intake of fresh and lean beef over total beef consumption to maximize the nutritional gains from beef portions while minimizing the resulting increases in energy, saturated fat, and sodium. View Full-Text
Keywords: beef consumption; nutrient intakes; diet quality; fresh lean beef; red meat consumption; nutrition guidelines beef consumption; nutrient intakes; diet quality; fresh lean beef; red meat consumption; nutrition guidelines
MDPI and ACS Style

An, R.; Nickols-Richardson, S.; Alston, R.; Shen, S.; Clarke, C. Total, Fresh, Lean, and Fresh Lean Beef Consumption in Relation to Nutrient Intakes and Diet Quality among U.S. Adults, 2005–2016. Nutrients 2019, 11, 563.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop