Next Article in Journal
Screening-Level Risk Assessment of a Hydrogen Refueling Station that Uses Organic Hydride
Next Article in Special Issue
Modeling Spatial Patterns of Humus Forms in Montane and Subalpine Forests: Implications of Local Variability for Upscaling
Previous Article in Journal
Analysing the Relationship between Price and Online Reputation by Lodging Category
Previous Article in Special Issue
An Incremental and Philosophically Different Approach to Measuring Raster Patch Porosity
Open AccessArticle

Evaluating Forest Protection Strategies: A Comparison of Land-Use Systems to Preventing Forest Loss in Tanzania

1
German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv), Deutscher Platz 5e, 04103 Leipzig, Germany
2
Institute of Biology, Faculty of Natural Sciences I, Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, 06120 Halle, Germany
3
School of Natural Sciences, Bangor University, Bangor LL57 2UW, UK
4
Lincoln Park Zoo, 2001 N. Clark St., Chicago, IL 60614, USA
5
Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2018, 10(12), 4476; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10124476
Received: 16 September 2018 / Revised: 22 November 2018 / Accepted: 24 November 2018 / Published: 28 November 2018
Understanding the effects of forest management strategies is especially important to avoid unregulated natural resource extraction that leads to ecosystem degradation. In addition to the loss of crucial forest services, inefficiencies at converting these natural resources into economic gain for people ultimately exacerbates poverty. Therefore, it is important to know which conservation strategies have proven to be effective in preventing ecosystem degradation and thus be encouraged in future management plans. Here, we used a high-resolution remotely sensed dataset spanning 15 years to study forest cover dynamics across various protected areas in Tanzania. Our findings highlight particular management approaches more effective in preventing forest cover loss and promote forest cover gain, and provide valuable information for conservation efforts. Results show that National Parks have the least forest cover loss, whereas multiple-use Game Controlled Areas have the highest rates of forest loss. In fact, results suggest that these multiple use areas tend to lose more forest cover than areas with no protection or management status at all. These findings suggest the need for more effective strategies for enforcing the existing policies to ensure that socio-economic benefits to local communities are maximized and national interests are sustained. View Full-Text
Keywords: sustainable forest management; management areas; African forests; multiple use; conservation; forest cover change sustainable forest management; management areas; African forests; multiple use; conservation; forest cover change
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Rosa, I.M.; Rentsch, D.; Hopcraft, J.G.C. Evaluating Forest Protection Strategies: A Comparison of Land-Use Systems to Preventing Forest Loss in Tanzania. Sustainability 2018, 10, 4476.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop