Next Article in Journal
Optimization of a Small Wind Turbine for a Rural Area: A Case Study of Deniliquin, New South Wales, Australia
Next Article in Special Issue
Hydrothermal Liquefaction of Rice Straw Using Methanol as Co-Solvent
Previous Article in Journal
Special Issue of the 1st International Conference on Nanofluids (ICNf19)
Previous Article in Special Issue
Torrefaction of Straw from Oats and Maize for Use as a Fuel and Additive to Organic Fertilizers—TGA Analysis, Kinetics as Products for Agricultural Purposes
Open AccessArticle

Decision-Making Process in the Circular Economy: A Case Study on University Food Waste-to-Energy Actions in Latin America

1
Department of Agricultural and Food Sciences, University of Bologna, 40127 Bologna, Italy
2
Agribusiness School, Tecnológico de Costa Rica, Cartago 30101, Costa Rica
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Energies 2020, 13(9), 2291; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13092291
Received: 2 April 2020 / Revised: 21 April 2020 / Accepted: 25 April 2020 / Published: 6 May 2020
Economies have begun to shift from linear to circular, adopting, among others, waste-to-energy approaches. Waste management is known to be a paramount challenge, and food waste (FW) in particular, has gained the interest of several actors due to its potential impacts and energy recovery opportunities. However, the selection of alternative valorization scenarios can pose several queries in certain contexts. This paper evaluates four FW valorization scenarios based on anaerobic digestion and composting, in comparison to landfilling, by applying a consistent decision-making framework through a combination of linear programming, Life Cycle Thinking (LCT), and Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP). The evaluation was built upon a case study of five universities in Costa Rica and portrayed the trade-offs between environmental impacts and cost categories from the scenarios and their side flows. Results indicate that the landfill scenario entails higher Global Warming Potential and Fresh Water Eutrophication impacts than the valorization scenarios; however, other impact categories and costs are affected. Centralized recovery facilities can increase the Global Warming Potential and the Land Use compared to semi-centralized ones. Experts provided insights, regarding the ease of adoption of composting, in contrast to the potential of energy sources substitution and economic savings from anaerobic digestion. View Full-Text
Keywords: centralized waste valorization; lifecycle thinking; AHP; side flow; anaerobic digestion; composting centralized waste valorization; lifecycle thinking; AHP; side flow; anaerobic digestion; composting
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Brenes-Peralta, L.; Jiménez-Morales, M.F.; Campos-Rodríguez, R.; De Menna, F.; Vittuari, M. Decision-Making Process in the Circular Economy: A Case Study on University Food Waste-to-Energy Actions in Latin America. Energies 2020, 13, 2291.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop