Special Issue "Byproducts, Waste Biomass and Products to form Green Diesel and Bio Crude Oils"

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "Bio-Energy".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Brajendra K. Sharma
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Illinois Sustainable Technology Center (ISTC), Prairie Research Institute, One Hazelwood Drive, MC-676, Champaign, IL 61820, USA
Interests: thermochemical conversion of nonfood, non-usable oleochemical feedstocks biofuels’ byproducts, waste biomass, and waste products (plastics, tires, MSW, etc.) to form green diesel and bio crude oils: Bio crude oil characterization; upgradation of bio-oils and biochar through catalytic process, extraction, and other processes: Biobased lubricant and additives development for industrial applications
Dr. Kirtika Kohli
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Illinois Sustainable Technology Center (ISTC), Prairie Research Institute, One Hazelwood Drive, MC-676, Champaign, IL 61820, USA
Interests: heterogenous catalysis; catalytic biomass conversion; hydrorefinning of bio-oils; heavy oils/residues hydroprocessing; catalyst deactivation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We would like to invite the submission of original research or review articles to a Special Issue of the journal Energies in the topics of byproducts, waste biomass, and products to form green diesel and bio crude oils. Renewable diesel and bio crude oils are environmentally benign and highly promising as an alternative to fossil oils. These products will have a significant share in future global energy portfolios and in reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The conversion technologies, system integration approaches, and life cycle impacts of bio-derived fuels can vary widely because of the large diversity of biomass feedstocks. However, the main challenges associated with biomass conversion processes are feedstock variability, the pre-treatment processes involved, land use concerns, and high production costs, which hinder their broad-scale market acceptance. Thus, new conversion technologies are expected to increase the production potential by allowing for the use of an array of waste biomass feeds (agricultural residues, forest residues, and industrial residues) and byproducts produced from current biomass conversion processes.

This Special Issue aims to encourage researchers to address recent progress in the biorefinery and biotransformation technologies for waste biomass conversion processes. Studies of advanced techniques and methods for green diesel and bio crude oil productions are highly encouraged.

Dr. Brajendra K. Sharma
Dr. Kirtika Kohli
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • non-edible oils (jatropha and algae oils)
  • plant-derived oils (soybean, palm, and rapeseed)
  • waste biomass (agricultural, forest, and industrial residues)
  • lignin conversion process
  • algae energy
  • algae cultivation
  • drop-in biofuels
  • chemical conversion
  • thermochemical conversion
  • biochemical conversion
  • hydrorefining
  • bio-oil upgrading

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Isolation and Characterization of Two Microalgal Isolates from Vietnam with Potential for Food, Feed, and Biodiesel Production
Energies 2020, 13(4), 898; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13040898 - 18 Feb 2020
Abstract
Microalgae are promising feedstock for the production of biodiesel and diverse medium- and high-value products such as pigments and polyunsaturated fatty acids. The importance of strain selection adapted to specific environments is important for economical purposes. We characterize here two microalgal strains, isolated [...] Read more.
Microalgae are promising feedstock for the production of biodiesel and diverse medium- and high-value products such as pigments and polyunsaturated fatty acids. The importance of strain selection adapted to specific environments is important for economical purposes. We characterize here two microalgal strains, isolated from wastewater of shrimp cultivation ponds in Vietnam. Based on the 18S rDNA-ITS region, one strain belongs to the Eustigmatophyceae class and is identical to the Nannochloropsis salina isolate D12 (JX185299.1), while the other is a Chlorophyceae belonging to the Desmodesmus genus, which possesses a S516 group I intron in its 18S rDNA gene. The N. salina strain is a marine and oleaginous microalga (40% of dry weight (DW) at stationary phase) whole oil is rich in saturated fatty acids (around 45% of C16:0) suitable for biodiesel and contains a few percent of eicosapentaenoic acid (C20:5). The Desmodesmus isolate can assimilate acetate and ammonium and is rich in lutein. Its oil contains around 40%–50% α-linolenic acid (C18:3), an essential fatty acid. Since they tolerate various salinities (10% to 35‰), both strains are thus interesting for biodiesel or aquaculture valorization in coastal and tropical climate where water, nutrient, and salinity availability vary greatly depending on the season. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Selective Hydrogenation of Phenol to Cyclohexanol over Ni/CNT in the Absence of External Hydrogen
Energies 2020, 13(4), 846; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13040846 - 14 Feb 2020
Abstract
Transfer hydrogenation is a novel and efficient method to realize the hydrogenation in different chemical reactions and exploring a simple heterogeneous catalyst with high activity is crucial. Ni/CNT was synthesized through a traditional impregnation method, and the detailed physicochemical properties were performed by [...] Read more.
Transfer hydrogenation is a novel and efficient method to realize the hydrogenation in different chemical reactions and exploring a simple heterogeneous catalyst with high activity is crucial. Ni/CNT was synthesized through a traditional impregnation method, and the detailed physicochemical properties were performed by means of XRD, TEM, XPS, BET, and ICP analysis. Through the screening of loading amounts, solvents, reaction temperature, and reaction time, 20% Ni/CNT achieves an almost complete conversion of phenol after 60 min at 220 °C in the absence of external hydrogen. Furthermore, the catalytic system is carried out on a variety of phenol derivatives for the generation of corresponding cyclohexanols with good to excellent results. The mechanism suggests that the hydrogenation of phenol to cyclohexanone is the first step, while the hydrogenation of cyclohexanone for the generation of cyclohexanol takes place in a successive step. Moreover, Ni/CNT catalyst can be magnetically recovered and reused in the next test for succeeding four times. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Production and Characterization of Biodiesel Derived from a Novel Source Koelreuteria paniculata Seed Oil
Energies 2020, 13(4), 791; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13040791 - 11 Feb 2020
Abstract
Biodiesel is a clean and renewable fuel, which is considered as the best alternative to diesel fuel, but the feedstock contributes more than 70% of the cost. The most important constituent essential for biodiesel development is to explore cheap feedstock with high oil [...] Read more.
Biodiesel is a clean and renewable fuel, which is considered as the best alternative to diesel fuel, but the feedstock contributes more than 70% of the cost. The most important constituent essential for biodiesel development is to explore cheap feedstock with high oil content. In this work, we found novel non-edible plant seeds of Koelreuteria paniculata (KP) with high oil contents of 28–30 wt.% and low free fatty acid contents (0.91%), which can serve as a promising feedstock for biodiesel production. KP seed oil can convert into biodiesel/fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) by base-catalyzed transesterification with the highest biodiesel production of 95.2% after an optimization process. We obtained the optimal transesterification conditions, i.e., oil/methanol ratio (6:1), catalyst concentration (0.32), reaction temperature (65 °C), stirring rate (700 rpm), and reaction time (80 min). The physico-chemical properties and composition of the FAME were investigated and compared with mineral diesel. The synthesized esters were confirmed and characterized by the application of NMR (1H and 13C), FTIR, and GC-MS. The biofuel produced from KP seed oil satisfies the conditions verbalized by ASTM D6751 and EN14214 standards. Accordingly, KP source oil can be presented as a novel raw material for biofuel fabrication. Full article
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