Next Article in Journal
A Conceptual Model Map on Health and Nutrition Behavior (CMMHB/NB)
Previous Article in Journal
Intimate Partner Violence: A Risk Factor for Gestational Diabetes
Open AccessArticle

Area-Level Associations between Built Environment Characteristics and Disability Prevalence in Australia: An Ecological Analysis

1
Centre of Research Excellence in Disability and Health, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010, Australia
2
Centre for Disability Research and Policy, University of Sydney, Lidcombe, NSW 2141, Australia
3
Centre for Health Equity & Centre for Epidemiology & Biostatistics, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne, Carlton, VIC 3053, Australia
4
Centre for Urban Research, RMIT University, Melbourne, VIC 3000, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(21), 7844; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17217844
Received: 13 August 2020 / Revised: 15 October 2020 / Accepted: 21 October 2020 / Published: 26 October 2020
The importance of health-promoting neighborhoods has long been recognized, and characteristics of local built environments are among the social determinants of health. People with disability are more likely than other population groups to experience geographic mobility and cost restrictions, and to be reliant on ‘opportunity structures’ available locally. We conducted an ecological analysis to explore associations between area-level disability prevalence for people aged 15–64 years and area-level built environment characteristics in Australia’s 21 largest cities. Overall, disability was more prevalent in areas with lower walkability and lower local availability of various neighborhood amenities such as public transport, healthier food options, public open space, physical activity and recreation destinations and health and mental health services. These patterns of lower liveability in areas of higher disability prevalence were observed in major cities but not in regional cities. Our findings suggest that geographically targeted interventions to improve access to health-enhancing neighborhood infrastructure could reduce disability-related inequalities in the social determinants of health. View Full-Text
Keywords: disability; liveability; social determinants of health; accessibility; geographic variation disability; liveability; social determinants of health; accessibility; geographic variation
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Fortune, N.; Singh, A.; Badland, H.; Stancliffe, R.J.; Llewellyn, G. Area-Level Associations between Built Environment Characteristics and Disability Prevalence in Australia: An Ecological Analysis. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 7844.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop