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Article

Physical Fitness of School-Age Children after Cancer Treatment

1
The Faculty of Physiotherapy, Wroclaw University School of Physical Education, 51-612 Wroclaw, Poland
2
“Cape of Hope” Clinic of Bone Marrow Transplantation, Oncology and Hematology, Wroclaw University Clinical Hospital, 50-556 Wroclaw, Poland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(8), 1436; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16081436
Received: 8 March 2019 / Revised: 17 April 2019 / Accepted: 19 April 2019 / Published: 23 April 2019
The aim of the study was to assess physical fitness of school-age children after cancer treatment. The study was comprised of one hundred and fifty six children—children after cancer treatment (n = 71, mean age 11.22 ± 3.11 years) vs. healthy children previously untreated for cancer (n = 85, mean age 10.71 ± 1.22 years). Physical fitness was assessed indirectly based on a ball throw (assessment of strength, coordination, and upper limb speed), long jump (assessment of jumping ability, speed, and coordination), and a 60 m run (assessment of speed). The analysis was performed based on the Student’s t-test for independent samples and the analysis of variance and the post-hoc least significant difference test (LSD test). Children from the study group threw the ball closer and had shorter long jump performance compared to the control group, i.e., 12.93 [m] vs. 19.79 [m], respectively (p < 0.001) and 2.46 [m] vs. 2.70 [m], respectively (p = 0.02). However, their mean running time was longer, i.e., 13.33 [s] vs. 11.73 [s], respectively (p = 0.01). Division according to sex showed additionally significantly shorter ball throw distance in the study group in both girls (p = 0.001) and boys (p < 0.001), significantly shorter jump length in the group of girls (p = 0.01), and significantly longer running time in the group of boys (p = 0.04). Children treated for cancer are characterized by decreased physical fitness, and motor ability is sex-dependent. Both groups showed decreased strength, coordination, and upper limb speed. Additionally, worse jumping ability was found in girls whereas decreased speed was observed in boys. View Full-Text
Keywords: child health; cancer; physical activity; physical fitness child health; cancer; physical activity; physical fitness
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MDPI and ACS Style

Malicka, I.; Mrowiec, J.; Sajkiewicz, N.; Siewierska, K.; Czajkowska, M.; Woźniewski, M. Physical Fitness of School-Age Children after Cancer Treatment. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 1436. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16081436

AMA Style

Malicka I, Mrowiec J, Sajkiewicz N, Siewierska K, Czajkowska M, Woźniewski M. Physical Fitness of School-Age Children after Cancer Treatment. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2019; 16(8):1436. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16081436

Chicago/Turabian Style

Malicka, Iwona, Joanna Mrowiec, Natalia Sajkiewicz, Katarzyna Siewierska, Maria Czajkowska, and Marek Woźniewski. 2019. "Physical Fitness of School-Age Children after Cancer Treatment" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 16, no. 8: 1436. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16081436

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