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Open AccessArticle

Effect of Native and Acetylated Dietary Resistant Starches on Intestinal Fermentative Capacity of Normal and Stunted Children in Southern India

1
Wellcome Research Unit (Biochemistry), Christian Medical College, Vellore, Tamil Nadu 632004, India
2
College of Medicine and Public Health, Flinders University of South Australia, Bedford Park 5045, South Australia, Australia
3
Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO 63110, USA
4
Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06510, USA
5
Australian Cancer Research Foundation, Sydney 2000, Australia
6
Department of Gastroenterology, Christian Medical College, Vellore, Tamil Nadu 632004, India
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Current address: Department of Biochemistry, All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), Bhubaneshwar, Odisha 751019, India.
Current address: Department of Physiology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, 117597 Singapore, Singapore.
§
Current address: Institute of Gastroenterology, SRM Institutes for Medical Science, Chennai, Tamil Nadu 600026, India.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(20), 3922; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16203922
Received: 10 September 2019 / Revised: 10 October 2019 / Accepted: 12 October 2019 / Published: 15 October 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Impact of the Gut Microbiota on Human Health)
The health benefits of dietary amylase resistant starch (RS) arise from intestinal microbial fermentation and generation of short chain fatty acids (SCFA). We compared the intestinal fermentative capability of stunted and nonstunted (‘healthy’) children in southern India using two types of RS: high amylose maize starch (HAMS) and acetylated HAMS (HAMSA). Twenty children (10 stunted and 10 healthy) aged 2 to 5 years were fed biscuits containing HAMS (10 g/day) for two weeks followed by a 2-week washout and then HAMSA biscuits (10 g/day) for 2 weeks. Fecal samples were collected at 3-4 day intervals and pH and SCFA analyzed. At entry, stunted children had lower SCFA concentrations compared to healthy children. Both types of RS led to a significant decrease in fecal pH and increase in fecal acetate and propionate in both healthy and stunted children. However, while HAMS increased fecal butyrate in both groups of children, HAMSA increased butyrate in healthy but not stunted children. Furthermore, healthy children showed a significantly greater increase than stunted children in both acetate and butyrate when fed either RS. No adverse effects were reported with either RS. Stunted children have impaired capacity to ferment certain types of RS which has implications for choice of RS in formulations aimed at improving microbial function in stunted children. View Full-Text
Keywords: gut microbiota; colonic microbiota; human health; dysbiosis; therapeutic strategies; prebiotic; resistant starch gut microbiota; colonic microbiota; human health; dysbiosis; therapeutic strategies; prebiotic; resistant starch
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Balamurugan, R.; Pugazhendhi, S.; Balachander, G.M.; Dharmalingam, T.; Mortimer, E.K.; Gopalsamy, G.L.; Woodman, R.J.; Meng, R.; Alpers, D.H.; Manary, M.; Binder, H.J.; Brown, I.L.; Young, G.P.; Ramakrishna, B.S. Effect of Native and Acetylated Dietary Resistant Starches on Intestinal Fermentative Capacity of Normal and Stunted Children in Southern India. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 3922.

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  • Supplementary File 1:

    ZIP-Document (ZIP, 714 KB)

  • Externally hosted supplementary file 1
    Doi: 10.5281/zenodo.3403562
    Description: Table S1: Dietary composition analysis of 3 healthy participants. Table S2: Dietary composition analysis of 3 stunted participants. Table S3: TREND Statement Checklist. Table S4: Participant biodata. Table S5: Nutrient composition-Study biscuits.
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