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Article

Comparison of Laboratory and Daily-Life Gait Speed Assessment during ON and OFF States in Parkinson’s Disease

1
Abel Salazar Biomedical Sciences Institute (ICBAS), University of Porto, 4050-313 Porto, Portugal
2
University Hospital Santo Antonio of Porto (CHUP), 4099-001 Porto, Portugal
3
Laboratory of Movement Analysis and Measurement, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne (EPFL), 1015 Lausanne, Switzerland
4
Department of Neurology, Christian-Albrechts-University, 24118 Kiel, Germany
5
Institute for Research and Innovation in Health (i3s), University of Porto, 4200-135 Porto, Portugal
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Emmanouil Rousakis
Sensors 2021, 21(12), 3974; https://doi.org/10.3390/s21123974
Received: 28 April 2021 / Revised: 31 May 2021 / Accepted: 7 June 2021 / Published: 9 June 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Approaches for Advancing Wearable Sensing Technologies)
Accurate assessment of Parkinson’s disease (PD) ON and OFF states in the usual environment is essential for tailoring optimal treatments. Wearables facilitate measurements of gait in novel and unsupervised environments; however, differences between unsupervised and in-laboratory measures have been reported in PD. We aimed to investigate whether unsupervised gait speed discriminates medication states and which supervised tests most accurately represent home performance. In-lab gait speeds from different gait tasks were compared to home speeds of 27 PD patients at ON and OFF states using inertial sensors. Daily gait speed distribution was expressed in percentiles and walking bout (WB) length. Gait speeds differentiated ON and OFF states in the lab and the home. When comparing lab with home performance, ON assessments in the lab showed moderate-to-high correlations with faster gait speeds in unsupervised environment (r = 0.69; p < 0.001), associated with long WB. OFF gait assessments in the lab showed moderate correlation values with slow gait speeds during OFF state at home (r = 0.56; p = 0.004), associated with short WB. In-lab and daily assessments of gait speed with wearables capture additional integrative aspects of PD, reflecting different aspects of mobility. Unsupervised assessment using wearables adds complementary information to the clinical assessment of motor fluctuations in PD. View Full-Text
Keywords: remote patient monitoring; medication states; Parkinson’s disease; lab vs. home; wearable sensors; human gait; gait speed remote patient monitoring; medication states; Parkinson’s disease; lab vs. home; wearable sensors; human gait; gait speed
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MDPI and ACS Style

Corrà, M.F.; Atrsaei, A.; Sardoreira, A.; Hansen, C.; Aminian, K.; Correia, M.; Vila-Chã, N.; Maetzler, W.; Maia, L. Comparison of Laboratory and Daily-Life Gait Speed Assessment during ON and OFF States in Parkinson’s Disease. Sensors 2021, 21, 3974. https://doi.org/10.3390/s21123974

AMA Style

Corrà MF, Atrsaei A, Sardoreira A, Hansen C, Aminian K, Correia M, Vila-Chã N, Maetzler W, Maia L. Comparison of Laboratory and Daily-Life Gait Speed Assessment during ON and OFF States in Parkinson’s Disease. Sensors. 2021; 21(12):3974. https://doi.org/10.3390/s21123974

Chicago/Turabian Style

Corrà, Marta Francisca, Arash Atrsaei, Ana Sardoreira, Clint Hansen, Kamiar Aminian, Manuel Correia, Nuno Vila-Chã, Walter Maetzler, and Luís Maia. 2021. "Comparison of Laboratory and Daily-Life Gait Speed Assessment during ON and OFF States in Parkinson’s Disease" Sensors 21, no. 12: 3974. https://doi.org/10.3390/s21123974

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