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Article

Human-Wildlife Conflict Mitigation Impacts Community Perceptions around Kibale National Park, Uganda

Department of Anthropology, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO 63130, USA
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Academic Editors: Joanna Lambert and Michael Wink
Diversity 2021, 13(4), 145; https://doi.org/10.3390/d13040145
Received: 1 December 2020 / Revised: 26 February 2021 / Accepted: 21 March 2021 / Published: 30 March 2021
The attitudes of community members living around protected areas are an important and often overlooked consideration for effective conservation strategies. Around Kibale National Park (KNP) in western Uganda, communities regularly face the threat of crop destruction from wildlife, including from a variety of endangered species, such as African elephants (Loxodonta africana), common chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), and red colobus monkeys (Piliocolobus tephrosceles), as well as other nonhuman primates, including olive baboons (Papio anubis). These frequent negative interactions with wildlife lead many community members to resent the park and the animals that live within it. To mitigate these issues, community members around KNP partnered with researchers to start a participatory action research project to reduce human-wildlife interactions. The project tested four sustainable human-wildlife conflict mitigation strategies: digging and maintaining trenches around the park border, installing beehive fences in swampy areas where trenches could not be dug, planting tea as a buffer, and growing garlic as a cash crop. These physical exclusion methods and agriculture-based deterrents aimed to reduce crop destruction by wild animals and improve conditions for humans and wildlife alike. We conducted oral surveys with members of participating communities and a nonparticipating community that border KNP to determine the impact of these sustainable human-wildlife conflict mitigation strategies on attitudes toward KNP, wildlife officials, and animal species in and around KNP. We found that there is a positive correlation between participation in the project and perceived benefits of living near KNP. We also found that respondents who participated in the project reported more positive feelings about the Uganda Wildlife Authority, the organization that oversees KNP. This research will help inform future conservation initiatives around KNP and other areas where humans and animals face conflict through crop damage. View Full-Text
Keywords: human-wildlife conflict; conservation; Kibale National Park; coexistence; crop raiding; participatory action research human-wildlife conflict; conservation; Kibale National Park; coexistence; crop raiding; participatory action research
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MDPI and ACS Style

Kolinski, L.; Milich, K.M. Human-Wildlife Conflict Mitigation Impacts Community Perceptions around Kibale National Park, Uganda. Diversity 2021, 13, 145. https://doi.org/10.3390/d13040145

AMA Style

Kolinski L, Milich KM. Human-Wildlife Conflict Mitigation Impacts Community Perceptions around Kibale National Park, Uganda. Diversity. 2021; 13(4):145. https://doi.org/10.3390/d13040145

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kolinski, Lev, and Krista M. Milich. 2021. "Human-Wildlife Conflict Mitigation Impacts Community Perceptions around Kibale National Park, Uganda" Diversity 13, no. 4: 145. https://doi.org/10.3390/d13040145

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