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Article

Regulation of Sulfur Homeostasis in Mycorrhizal Maize Plants Grown in a Fe-Limited Environment

1
Plant Physiology and Morphology Laboratory, Crop Science Department, Agricultural University of Athens, 75 Iera Odos, Athens 11855, Greece
2
Plant Science Department, Rothamsted Research, West Common, Harpenden, Hertfordshire AL5 2JQ, UK
3
School of Biosciences, Faculty of Science, University of Nottingham, Sutton Bonington Campus, Sutton Bonington, Leicestershire LE12 5RD, UK
4
Max Planck Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology, 14476 Potsdam Golm, Germany
5
Botanical Institute, Cologne Biocenter, University of Cologne, D–50674 Cologne, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(9), 3249; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21093249
Received: 28 March 2020 / Revised: 22 April 2020 / Accepted: 2 May 2020 / Published: 4 May 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Iron and Sulfur in Plants)
Sulfur is an essential macronutrient for growth of higher plants. The entry of the sulfate anion into the plant, its importation into the plastids for assimilation, its long-distance transport through the vasculature, and its storage in the vacuoles require specific sulfate transporter proteins. In this study, mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal maize plants were grown for 60 days in an S-deprived substrate, whilst iron was provided to the plants in the sparingly soluble form of FePO4. On day 60, sulfate was provided to the plants. The gene expression patterns of a number of sulfate transporters as well as sulfate assimilation enzymes were studied in leaves and roots of maize plants, both before as well as after sulfate supply. Prolonged sulfur deprivation resulted in a more or less uniform response of the genes’ expressions in the roots of non-mycorrhizal and mycorrhizal plants. This was not the case neither in the roots and leaves after the supply of sulfur, nor in the leaves of the plants during the S-deprived period of time. It is concluded that mycorrhizal symbiosis modified plant demands for reduced sulfur, regulating accordingly the uptake, distribution, and assimilation of the sulfate anion. View Full-Text
Keywords: iron limitation; maize; mycorrhizal symbiosis; sulfate assimilation; sulfate transporters; sulfate uptake; sulfur deprivation iron limitation; maize; mycorrhizal symbiosis; sulfate assimilation; sulfate transporters; sulfate uptake; sulfur deprivation
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MDPI and ACS Style

Chorianopoulou, S.N.; Sigalas, P.P.; Tsoutsoura, N.; Apodiakou, A.; Saridis, G.; Ventouris, Y.E.; Bouranis, D.L. Regulation of Sulfur Homeostasis in Mycorrhizal Maize Plants Grown in a Fe-Limited Environment. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21, 3249. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21093249

AMA Style

Chorianopoulou SN, Sigalas PP, Tsoutsoura N, Apodiakou A, Saridis G, Ventouris YE, Bouranis DL. Regulation of Sulfur Homeostasis in Mycorrhizal Maize Plants Grown in a Fe-Limited Environment. International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 2020; 21(9):3249. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21093249

Chicago/Turabian Style

Chorianopoulou, Styliani N., Petros P. Sigalas, Niki Tsoutsoura, Anastasia Apodiakou, Georgios Saridis, Yannis E. Ventouris, and Dimitris L. Bouranis. 2020. "Regulation of Sulfur Homeostasis in Mycorrhizal Maize Plants Grown in a Fe-Limited Environment" International Journal of Molecular Sciences 21, no. 9: 3249. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21093249

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