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Gut Microbiota and Colon Cancer: A Role for Bacterial Protein Toxins?

1
Association for Research on Integrative Oncology Therapies (ARTOI), Via Ludovico Micara, 73, 00165 Rome, Italy
2
Department of Cardiovascular, Endocrine-Metabolic Diseases and Aging, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Viale Regina Elena, 299, 00161 Rome, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(17), 6201; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21176201
Received: 27 July 2020 / Revised: 25 August 2020 / Accepted: 26 August 2020 / Published: 27 August 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bacterial Protein Toxins: Enemies within or Unexpected Friends 2.0)
Accumulating evidence indicates that the human intestinal microbiota can contribute to the etiology of colorectal cancer. Triggering factors, including inflammation and bacterial infections, may favor the shift of the gut microbiota from a mutualistic to a pro-carcinogenic configuration. In this context, certain bacterial pathogens can exert a pro-tumoral activity by producing enzymatically-active protein toxins that either directly induce host cell DNA damage or interfere with essential host cell signaling pathways involved in cell proliferation, apoptosis, and inflammation. This review is focused on those toxins that, by mimicking carcinogens and cancer promoters, could represent a paradigm for bacterially induced carcinogenesis. View Full-Text
Keywords: colorectal neoplasms; gut microbiota; bacterial protein toxin; bacterial infections; inflammation; carcinogenesis; cell proliferation; DNA damage colorectal neoplasms; gut microbiota; bacterial protein toxin; bacterial infections; inflammation; carcinogenesis; cell proliferation; DNA damage
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Fiorentini, C.; Carlini, F.; Germinario, E.A.P.; Maroccia, Z.; Travaglione, S.; Fabbri, A. Gut Microbiota and Colon Cancer: A Role for Bacterial Protein Toxins? Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21, 6201.

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