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Connexins: Synthesis, Post-Translational Modifications, and Trafficking in Health and Disease

1
Translational Molecular Pathology, Vall d’Hebron Institute of Research (VHIR), Autonomous University of Barcelona, CIBERONC, 08035 Barcelona, Spain
2
Robert M. Berne Cardiovascular Research Center, University of Virginia School of Medicine, P.O. Box 801394, Charlottesville, VI 22908, USA
3
Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8TT, UK
4
Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA
5
Department of Cell Biology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2018, 19(5), 1296; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms19051296
Received: 19 March 2018 / Revised: 20 April 2018 / Accepted: 21 April 2018 / Published: 26 April 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Interplay of Connexins and Pannexins in Tissue Function and Disease)
Connexins are tetraspan transmembrane proteins that form gap junctions and facilitate direct intercellular communication, a critical feature for the development, function, and homeostasis of tissues and organs. In addition, a growing number of gap junction-independent functions are being ascribed to these proteins. The connexin gene family is under extensive regulation at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level, and undergoes numerous modifications at the protein level, including phosphorylation, which ultimately affects their trafficking, stability, and function. Here, we summarize these key regulatory events, with emphasis on how these affect connexin multifunctionality in health and disease. View Full-Text
Keywords: connexins; gap junctions; transcription; translation; post-translational modifications; trafficking connexins; gap junctions; transcription; translation; post-translational modifications; trafficking
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Aasen, T.; Johnstone, S.; Vidal-Brime, L.; Lynn, K.S.; Koval, M. Connexins: Synthesis, Post-Translational Modifications, and Trafficking in Health and Disease. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2018, 19, 1296.

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