Next Article in Journal
Coordination Polymers Based on a Biphenyl Tetraphosphonate Linker: Synthesis Control and Photoluminescence
Next Article in Special Issue
Ulva intestinalis Protein Extracts Promote In Vitro Collagen and Hyaluronic Acid Production by Human Dermal Fibroblasts
Previous Article in Journal
COVID-19, Chloroquine Repurposing, and Cardiac Safety Concern: Chirality Might Help
Previous Article in Special Issue
Inhibitory Effects of Aucklandia lappa Decne. Extract on Inflammatory and Oxidative Responses in LPS-Treated Macrophages
Open AccessArticle

Mulberry Fruit Cultivar ‘Chiang Mai’ Prevents Beta-Amyloid Toxicity in PC12 Neuronal Cells and in a Drosophila Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

1
Institute of Nutrition, Mahidol University, Salaya, Phuttamonthon, Nakhon Pathom 73170, Thailand
2
Office of Sericulture Conservation and Standard Conformity Assessment, The Queen Sirikit Department of Sericulture, Ministry of Agriculture and Cooperatives, Bangkok 10900, Thailand
3
The Queen Sirikit Department of Sericulture Center (Kanchanaburi), Nong Ya, Mueang Kanchanaburi District, Kanchanaburi 71000, Thailand
4
Institute of Food Research and Product Development, Kasetsart University, Chatuchak, Bangkok 10900, Thailand
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Molecules 2020, 25(8), 1837; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25081837
Received: 25 March 2020 / Revised: 9 April 2020 / Accepted: 14 April 2020 / Published: 16 April 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Extracts: Biological and Pharmacological Activity)
Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia, characterized by chronic neuron loss and cognitive problems. Aggregated amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides, a product of cleaved amyloid precursor protein (APP) by beta-secretase 1 (BACE-1), have been indicated for the progressive pathogenesis of AD. Currently, screening for anti-AD compounds in foodstuffs is increasing, with promising results. Hence, the purpose of this study was to investigate the extraction conditions, phytochemical contents, and anti-AD properties, targeting Aβ peptides of Morus cf. nigra ‘Chiang Mai’ (MNCM) both in vitro and in vivo. Data showed that the aqueous extract of MNCM contained high amounts of cyanidin, keracyanin, and kuromanin as anthocyanidin and anthocyanins. The extract also strongly inhibited cholinesterases and BACE-1 in vitro. Moreover, MNCM extract prevented Aβ-induced neurotoxicity and promoted neurite outgrowth in neuronal cells. Interestingly, MNCM extract reduced Aβ1–42 peptides and improved locomotory coordination of Drosophila co-expressing human APP and BACE-1, specifically in the brain. These findings suggest that MNCM may be useful as an AD preventive agent by targeting Aβ formation. View Full-Text
Keywords: Morus species; Alzheimer’s disease; anthocyanins; anthocyanidins; amyloid peptides; beta-secretase 1; Drosophila melanogaster Morus species; Alzheimer’s disease; anthocyanins; anthocyanidins; amyloid peptides; beta-secretase 1; Drosophila melanogaster
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Suttisansanee, U.; Charoenkiatkul, S.; Jongruaysup, B.; Tabtimsri, S.; Siriwan, D.; Temviriyanukul, P. Mulberry Fruit Cultivar ‘Chiang Mai’ Prevents Beta-Amyloid Toxicity in PC12 Neuronal Cells and in a Drosophila Model of Alzheimer’s Disease. Molecules 2020, 25, 1837.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop