Next Article in Journal
Naphthoquinone Derivatives with Anti-Inflammatory Activity from Mangrove-Derived Endophytic Fungus Talaromyces sp. SK-S009
Next Article in Special Issue
Quercetin Inhibits Cell Survival and Metastatic Ability via the EMT-Mediated Pathway in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma
Previous Article in Journal
Deep Eutectic Solvents as Effective Reaction Media for the Synthesis of 2-Hydroxyphenylbenzimidazole-Based Scaffolds en Route to Donepezil-Like Compounds
Previous Article in Special Issue
The Antiproliferative Activity of Oxypeucedanin via Induction of G2/M Phase Cell Cycle Arrest and p53-Dependent MDM2/p21 Expression in Human Hepatoma Cells
Open AccessReview

Molecular Mechanisms of the Anti-Cancer Effects of Isothiocyanates from Cruciferous Vegetables in Bladder Cancer

Department of Urology, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki 852-8501, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Molecules 2020, 25(3), 575; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25030575
Received: 10 January 2020 / Revised: 24 January 2020 / Accepted: 28 January 2020 / Published: 29 January 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antitumor and Anti-HIV Agents from Natural Products)
Bladder cancer (BC) is a representative of urological cancer with a high recurrence and metastasis potential. Currently, cisplatin-based chemotherapy and immune checkpoint inhibitors are used as standard therapy in patients with advanced/metastatic BC. However, these therapies often show severe adverse events, and prolongation of survival is unsatisfactory. Therefore, a treatment strategy using natural compounds is of great interest. In this review, we focused on the anti-cancer effects of isothiocyanates (ITCs) derived from cruciferous vegetables, which are widely cultivated and consumed in many regions worldwide. Specifically, we discuss the anti-cancer effects of four ITC compounds—allyl isothiocyanate, benzyl isothiocyanate, sulforaphane, and phenethyl isothiocyanate—in BC; the molecular mechanisms underlying their anti-cancer effects; current trends and future direction of ITC-based treatment strategies; and the carcinogenic potential of ITCs. We also discuss the advantages and limitations of each ITC in BC treatment, furthering the consideration of ITCs in treatment strategies and for improving the prognosis of patients with BC. View Full-Text
Keywords: allyl isothiocyanate; benzyl isothiocyanate; sulforaphane; phenethyl isothiocyanate; bladder cancer allyl isothiocyanate; benzyl isothiocyanate; sulforaphane; phenethyl isothiocyanate; bladder cancer
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Mastuo, T.; Miyata, Y.; Yuno, T.; Mukae, Y.; Otsubo, A.; Mitsunari, K.; Ohba, K.; Sakai, H. Molecular Mechanisms of the Anti-Cancer Effects of Isothiocyanates from Cruciferous Vegetables in Bladder Cancer. Molecules 2020, 25, 575. https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25030575

AMA Style

Mastuo T, Miyata Y, Yuno T, Mukae Y, Otsubo A, Mitsunari K, Ohba K, Sakai H. Molecular Mechanisms of the Anti-Cancer Effects of Isothiocyanates from Cruciferous Vegetables in Bladder Cancer. Molecules. 2020; 25(3):575. https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25030575

Chicago/Turabian Style

Mastuo, Tomhiro; Miyata, Yasuyoshi; Yuno, Tsutomu; Mukae, Yuta; Otsubo, Asato; Mitsunari, Kensuke; Ohba, Kojiro; Sakai, Hideki. 2020. "Molecular Mechanisms of the Anti-Cancer Effects of Isothiocyanates from Cruciferous Vegetables in Bladder Cancer" Molecules 25, no. 3: 575. https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25030575

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop