Topic Editors

Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Aichi Medical University, Nagakute 480-1195, Aichi, Japan
Multidisciplinary Pain Center, Aichi Medical University, Nagakute 480-1195, Aichi, Japan

Pathology and Current State of Treatment of Chronic Pain

Abstract submission deadline
closed (31 March 2024)
Manuscript submission deadline
31 July 2024
Viewed by
7963

Topic Information

Dear Colleagues,

Laboratory tests, such as imaging and blood tests, are necessary to determine the specific cause of pain and provide guidance for treatment. However, medical research has shown that identifying the cause of chronic low back pain can be difficult, and it is now widely acknowledged that chronic pain can be caused by various factors. Hence, it is crucial to individually investigate the potential causes of chronic pain. For instance, there are reports suggesting a correlation between the degree of knee osteoarthritis (OA) and both deformity and pain severity in musculoskeletal pain. However, there are also reports indicating that there is no such correlation, and a definitive consensus has not been reached. Therefore, more evidence is required. This Topic will feature a study that explores the connection between objective clinical findings and chronic pain in patients.

Dr. Tatsunori Ikemoto
Dr. Young-Chang Arai
Topic Editors

Keywords

  • chronic pain
  • objective clinical findings
  • laboratory tests
  • imaging
  • blood test
  • treatment

Participating Journals

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
Clinics and Practice
clinpract
1.7 2.6 2011 23.7 Days CHF 1600 Submit
Journal of Clinical Medicine
jcm
3.0 5.7 2012 17.3 Days CHF 2600 Submit
Journal of Personalized Medicine
jpm
3.0 4.1 2011 16.7 Days CHF 2600 Submit
Healthcare
healthcare
2.4 3.5 2013 20.5 Days CHF 2700 Submit
Diagnostics
diagnostics
3.0 4.7 2011 20.5 Days CHF 2600 Submit

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Published Papers (5 papers)

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14 pages, 479 KiB  
Review
Oxygen–Ozone Therapy of Musculoskeletal Neck Pain: A Review
by Jiri Jandura, Milan Vajda, Michal Cech and Pavel Ryska
J. Pers. Med. 2024, 14(3), 326; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm14030326 - 21 Mar 2024
Viewed by 1373
Abstract
Minimally invasive oxygen–ozone (O2-O3) therapy utilizing the biochemical effects of O2-O3 mixture is commonly used in the treatment of musculoskeletal pain. The literature dealing with O2-O3 therapy of spinal pain focuses mainly on [...] Read more.
Minimally invasive oxygen–ozone (O2-O3) therapy utilizing the biochemical effects of O2-O3 mixture is commonly used in the treatment of musculoskeletal pain. The literature dealing with O2-O3 therapy of spinal pain focuses mainly on the lumbosacral region. The aim of this review is to evaluate the efficacy of O2-O3 therapy in musculoskeletal pain in the neck region. The Medline (PubMed), SCOPUS, Web of Science, and Google Scholar databases were searched for clinical studies, using the free text terms: ozone, neck, cervical, spine, pain, disc, hernia, nucleolysis, paravertebral, treatment, and various combinations of them. In total, seven studies (two randomized controlled trials and five observational studies) were found. These studies dealt with the intradiscal or intramuscular paravertebral application of O2-O3 mixture in patients with myofascial pain syndrome, cervical disc hernias, and chronic neck pain. All these studies proved a significant decrease in neck pain (evaluated by Visual Analog Scale or Numerical Rating Scale), and most of them showed improvement in functional status (measured by Oswestry Disability Index or Neck Disability Index). In addition, other pain assessment scales and function and quality of life measures (DN4 questionnaire, pain pressure threshold, cervical lateral flexion range of motion, Japanese Orthopedic Association scale, 12- and 36-Item Short Form Surveys, modified MacNab criteria, and analgesic drug intake reduction) were used. Changes in these measurements also mostly supported the efficacy of O2-O3 treatment. No significant complications of the treatment were reported. The available evidence is sparse, but despite this, the O2-O3 treatment of musculoskeletal neck pain can be considered potentially beneficial and relatively safe. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Pathology and Current State of Treatment of Chronic Pain)
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7 pages, 841 KiB  
Case Report
Diagnostic and Therapeutic Challenges of Oligosymptomatic Vesicovaginal Fistula in the Complex Case of Endometriosis
by Agnieszka A. Strojny, Arkadiusz Baran, Katarzyna Wiejak, Anna Scholz and Radosław B. Maksym
Clin. Pract. 2024, 14(2), 436-442; https://doi.org/10.3390/clinpract14020033 - 12 Mar 2024
Viewed by 1018
Abstract
Endometriosis is a complex condition causing surgical challenges, sometimes leading to urogynecological complications, the diagnosis and treatment of which are not always obvious. We present a case of a 46-year-old woman with a history of severe endometriosis and adenomyosis who developed an oligosymptomatic [...] Read more.
Endometriosis is a complex condition causing surgical challenges, sometimes leading to urogynecological complications, the diagnosis and treatment of which are not always obvious. We present a case of a 46-year-old woman with a history of severe endometriosis and adenomyosis who developed an oligosymptomatic vesicovaginal fistula (VVF) as a complication of surgery. The patient’s medical history included multiple surgeries for endometriosis, a cesarean section, and a laparoscopic hysterectomy. After the excision of the full-thickness infiltration of the urinary bladder, she experienced postoperative bowel obstruction treated by laparotomy. Subsequent urinary complications of bladder healing were eventually recognized as oligosymptomatic VVF. Symptoms of VVFs may vary, making a diagnosis challenging, especially when the lesion is narrow. Imaging techniques such as cystoscopy and cystography are helpful for diagnosis. The treatment options for VVFs range from surgical repair to conservative methods, like bladder catheterization, hormonal therapy, and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injections, depending on the lesions’ size and location. In this case, the patient’s VVF was treated with PRP injections, a low-invasive method in urogynecology. PRP, known for its pleiotropic role, is increasingly used in medicine, including gynecology. The patient’s fistula closed after 6 weeks from the PRP session, highlighting the potential of this conservative treatment modality. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Pathology and Current State of Treatment of Chronic Pain)
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13 pages, 315 KiB  
Review
The Management of Chronic Pain: Re-Centring Person-Centred Care
by Kristy Themelis and Nicole K. Y. Tang
J. Clin. Med. 2023, 12(22), 6957; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm12226957 - 7 Nov 2023
Viewed by 2209
Abstract
The drive for a more person-centred approach in the broader field of clinical medicine is also gaining traction in chronic pain treatment. Despite current advances, a further departure from ‘business as usual’ is required to ensure that the care offered or received is [...] Read more.
The drive for a more person-centred approach in the broader field of clinical medicine is also gaining traction in chronic pain treatment. Despite current advances, a further departure from ‘business as usual’ is required to ensure that the care offered or received is not only effective but also considers personal values, goals, abilities, and day-to-day realities. Existing work typically focuses on explaining pain symptoms and the development of standardised interventions, at the risk of overlooking the broader consequences of pain in individuals’ lives and individual differences in pain responses. This review underscores the importance of considering additional factors, such as the influence of chronic pain on an individual’s sense of self. It explores innovative approaches to chronic pain management that have the potential to optimise effectiveness and offer person-centred care. Furthermore, it delves into research applying hybrid and individual formulations, along with self-monitoring technologies, to enhance pain assessment and the tailoring of management strategies. In conclusion, this review advocates for chronic pain management approaches that align with an individual’s priorities and realities while fostering their active involvement in self-monitoring and self-management. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Pathology and Current State of Treatment of Chronic Pain)
13 pages, 464 KiB  
Article
Associations of Muscle Strength with Central Aspects of Pain: Data from the Knee Pain and Related Health in the Community (KPIC) Cohort
by Daniel F. McWilliams, Bin Yue, Stephanie L. Smith, Joanne Stocks, Michael Doherty, Ana M. Valdes, Weiya Zhang, Aliya Sarmanova, Gwen S. Fernandes, Kehinde Akin-Akinyosoye, Michelle Hall and David A. Walsh
J. Pers. Med. 2023, 13(10), 1450; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm13101450 - 29 Sep 2023
Viewed by 1064
Abstract
Knee pain is associated with lower muscle strength, and both contribute to disability. Peripheral and central neurological mechanisms contribute to OA pain. Understanding the relative contributions of pain mechanisms to muscle strength might help future treatments. The Knee Pain and related health In [...] Read more.
Knee pain is associated with lower muscle strength, and both contribute to disability. Peripheral and central neurological mechanisms contribute to OA pain. Understanding the relative contributions of pain mechanisms to muscle strength might help future treatments. The Knee Pain and related health In the Community (KPIC) cohort provided baseline and year 1 data from people with early knee pain (n = 219) for longitudinal analyses. A cross-sectional analysis was performed with baseline data from people with established knee pain (n = 103) and comparative data from people without knee pain (n = 98). Quadriceps and handgrip strength indicated local and general muscle weakness, respectively. The indices of peripheral nociceptive drive were knee radiographic and ultrasound scores. The indices associated with central pain mechanisms were Pressure Pain detection Threshold (PPT) distal to the knee, and a validated self-report Central Aspects of Pain Factor (CAPF). The associations were explored using correlation and multivariable regression. Weaker quadriceps strength was associated with both high CAPF and low PPT at baseline. Year 1 quadriceps weakness was predicted by higher baseline CAPF (β = −0.28 (95% CI: −0.55, −0.01), p = 0.040). Weaker baseline and year 1 handgrip strength was also associated with higher baseline CAPF. Weaker baseline quadriceps strength was associated with radiographic scores in bivariate but not adjusted analyses. Quadriceps strength was not significantly associated with total ultrasound scores. Central pain mechanisms might contribute to muscle weakness, both locally and remote from the knee. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Pathology and Current State of Treatment of Chronic Pain)
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11 pages, 1526 KiB  
Article
Associations between Degenerative Lumbar Scoliosis Structures and Pain Distribution in Adults with Chronic Low Back Pain
by Shoji Kojima, Tatsunori Ikemoto, Young-Chang Arai, Atsuhiko Hirasawa, Masataka Deie and Nobunori Takahashi
Healthcare 2023, 11(16), 2357; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare11162357 - 21 Aug 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1146
Abstract
Background: This study aimed to investigate the location and distribution of pain in adults with chronic low back pain (LBP) with degenerative lumbar scoliosis (DLS) according to coronal deformities. Methods: We enrolled 100 adults with chronic LBP and DLS, dividing them into two [...] Read more.
Background: This study aimed to investigate the location and distribution of pain in adults with chronic low back pain (LBP) with degenerative lumbar scoliosis (DLS) according to coronal deformities. Methods: We enrolled 100 adults with chronic LBP and DLS, dividing them into two groups, a right-convex DLS group (n = 50) and a left-convex DLS group (n = 50). Dominant pain location was analyzed by dividing it into three parts—left side, right side, and center—and pain areas were identified using the pain drawing method; then, a heat map was created for each group. An association between pain location and convex side was analyzed as the primary outcome. Additionally, we assessed pain characteristics and radiological parameters, such as the curve structure and degree of degeneration. We used the Mann–Whitney U test or the chi-squared test to compare the clinical characteristics of the two groups, and generalized linear models were utilized to determine which variables were associated with pain severity or pain area. Results: The results indicated that there was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of the association between the curve structure, pain severity and location. In multivariate analysis, although we did not find any variables associated with pain severity, we observed that age and a left-convex DLS were negatively correlated with pain area among all participants. The heat map demonstrated that individuals with chronic LBP frequently experienced pain in the central lumbar region, regardless of the coronal curve structure. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that degenerative coronal lumbar deformities may not have a specific pain pattern associated with a curved structure. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Pathology and Current State of Treatment of Chronic Pain)
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