Topic Editors

Department of Physiotherapy, Faculty of Nursing, Physiotherapy and Podiatry, University of Seville, 41009 Seville, Spain
Physiotherapy Department, Faculty of Nursing, Physiotherapy and Podiatry, University of Seville, 41009 Seville, Spain
1. Institute for Biomedical Innovation of Cadiz (INIBICA), 11009 Cádiz, Spain
2. Department of Physiology, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Seville, 41012 Seville, Spain

Advances in Exercise-Induced Neurogenesis, Neuronal and Functional Adaptations in Neurorehabilitation

Abstract submission deadline
22 October 2024
Manuscript submission deadline
22 December 2024
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725

Topic Information

Dear Colleagues,

Recent advancements in neurorehabilitation have spotlighted the transformative effects of exercise-induced neurogenesis and the accompanying neuronal and functional adaptations. This multifaceted approach to rehabilitation holds promise for individuals recovering from neurological conditions, offering a holistic perspective on recovery.

Exercise-induced neurogenesis, involving the generation of new neurons stimulated by physical activity, stands as a cornerstone in this paradigm. Studies indicate that exercise not only fosters the birth of new neurons in the brain but also promotes their integration into existing neural networks. This process contributes to enhanced cognitive function and may play a pivotal role in neurological recovery.

Beyond neurogenesis, neurorehabilitation embraces neuronal adaptations, encompassing structural and connectivity changes within the nervous system. Exercise has been shown to induce neuroplasticity, modifying the strength and efficiency of neural connections. This adaptability of the nervous system proves crucial in optimizing motor skills, facilitating learning, and improving overall neurological function.

The integration of exercise-induced neurogenesis and its associated neuronal and functional adaptations marks a significant stride in neurorehabilitation. This comprehensive approach addresses not only the biological aspects of recovery but also extends its impact to the practical facets of individuals' lives.

The objective of this Topic is to present the most recent advancements in the field of neurorehabilitation, transitioning from a biomolecular perspective to practical clinical approaches.

Dr. Carlos Bernal-Utrera
Prof. Dr. Cleofas Rodriguez-Blanco
Dr. Maria Livia Carrascal Moreno
Topic Editors

Keywords

  • exercise
  • neurogenesis
  • neurorehabilitation
  • neuro-regeneration
  • physiotherapy
  • physiology
  • quality of life
  • aging

Participating Journals

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
Biomedicines
biomedicines
4.7 3.7 2013 15.4 Days CHF 2600 Submit
International Journal of Molecular Sciences
ijms
5.6 7.8 2000 16.3 Days CHF 2900 Submit
Journal of Clinical Medicine
jcm
3.9 5.4 2012 17.9 Days CHF 2600 Submit
Medicina
medicina
2.6 3.6 1920 19.6 Days CHF 1800 Submit
Neurology International
neurolint
3.0 2.2 2009 23.3 Days CHF 1600 Submit

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Published Papers (1 paper)

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18 pages, 2513 KiB  
Systematic Review
Influence of High-Intensity Interval Training on Neuroplasticity Markers in Post-Stroke Patients: Systematic Review
by Gines Montero-Almagro, Carlos Bernal-Utrera, Noelia Geribaldi-Doldán, Pedro Nunez-Abades, Carmen Castro and Cleofas Rodriguez-Blanco
J. Clin. Med. 2024, 13(7), 1985; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm13071985 - 29 Mar 2024
Viewed by 395
Abstract
Background: Exercise has shown beneficial effects on neuronal neuroplasticity; therefore, we want to analyze the influence of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) on neuroplasticity markers in post-stroke patients. Methods: A systematic review of RCTs including studies with stroke participants was conducted using the following [...] Read more.
Background: Exercise has shown beneficial effects on neuronal neuroplasticity; therefore, we want to analyze the influence of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) on neuroplasticity markers in post-stroke patients. Methods: A systematic review of RCTs including studies with stroke participants was conducted using the following databases (PubMed, LILACS, ProQuest, PEDro, Web of Science). Searches lasted till (20/11/2023). Studies that used a HIIT protocol as the main treatment or as a coadjutant treatment whose outcomes were neural plasticity markers were used and compared with other exercise protocols, controls or other kinds of treatment. Studies that included other neurological illnesses, comorbidities that interfere with stroke or patients unable to complete a HIIT protocol were excluded. HIIT protocol, methods to assess intensity, neuroplasticity markers (plasmatic and neurophysiological) and other types of assessments such as cognitive scales were extracted to make a narrative synthesis. Jadad and PEDro scales were used to assess bias. Results: Eight articles were included, one included lacunar stroke (less than 3 weeks) and the rest had chronic stroke. The results found here indicate that HIIT facilitates neuronal recovery in response to an ischemic injury. This type of training increases the plasma concentrations of lactate, BDNF and VEGF, which are neurotrophic and growth factors involved in neuroplasticity. HIIT also positively regulates other neurophysiological measurements that are directly associated with a better outcome in motor learning tasks. Conclusions: We conclude that HIIT improves post-stroke recovery by increasing neuroplasticity markers. However, a limited number of studies have been found indicating that future studies are needed that assess this effect and include the analysis of the number of intervals and their duration in order to maximize this effect. Full article
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