Special Issue "Remote Sensing Observation on Coastal Change"

A special issue of Remote Sensing (ISSN 2072-4292). This special issue belongs to the section "Ocean Remote Sensing".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2022 | Viewed by 1766

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Manon Besset
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
i-Sea, 33700 Bordeaux, Frane
Interests: remote sensing; coastal dynamics; human impact; river deltas
Dr. Halina Kaczmarek
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Department of Landscape Geography, Institute of Geography, Kazimierz Wielki University, 85-033 Bydgoszcz, Poland
Interests: remote sensing; TLS; coastal processes; geomorphology; water reservoirs

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Coastal changes have become the daily constraint for a large majority of coastal human, plant and animal populations and a headache for the authorities concerned that must deal with knowledge and data that quickly become obsolete or incomplete. These changes are generally the result of natural, forced, disturbed sediment dynamics. Field monitoring of sediment stocks and movements, however, remains spatially and temporally limited. To complement the contribution of in situ measurements and facilitate systematic surveying, various strategies have recently emerged using innovative technologies in remote sensing (RS), but also by seeking proxies of any sediment imbalance at the origin or resulting from the observed coastal anomalies. Coastal change is not limited to erosion in the form of coastal retreat and/or subsidence, but it also integrates transformation of the vegetation, changes in management, protection, and occupation ways, as well as effectiveness and rapidness of the coastal resilience in the face of weather–climate imbalances in the very short (storm, cyclone, etc.) or longer term (sea level rise). 

The aim of this Special Issue is using high-frequency RS monitoring of morphological indicators of the coastline, the bathymetry changes, or the evolution of coastal vegetation, the expert community applies itself to respond to many questions on these complex interfaces at the junction of terrestrial, marine, and meteorological mechanisms and other natural constraints, to which are added those exerted by human activities. The crossing of disciplines, measurements, and datasets is in the spotlight to translate observations into expression of sediment imbalances (from stock to transit) and into levels of exposure to hazards.

In this Special Issue, various articles will shed light on cases where new RS practices for monitoring erosion and any non-ordinary changes in the coastal fringe are applied to erosion hotspots and/or sectors under very strong anthropogenic and climate pressure. The coupling of tools, disciplines, and spatial and time scales is welcome.

Dr. Manon Besset
Dr. Halina Kaczmarek
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Remote Sensing is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Coastal changes
  • Hazards
  • Human pressure
  • Sediment dynamics
  • High-frequency monitoring
  • Land use change
  • Coastal erosion
  • Climate impact

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Article
Assessment of Moraine Cliff Spatio-Temporal Erosion on Wolin Island Using ALS Data Analysis
Remote Sens. 2022, 14(13), 3115; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs14133115 - 28 Jun 2022
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Abstract
The aim of the article is to present the temporal and spatial variability of the cliff coast erosion of the Wolin Island in 2012–2020 in three time periods (2012–2015, 2015–2018, 2018–2020). The research used data from airborne laser scanning (ALS), based on which [...] Read more.
The aim of the article is to present the temporal and spatial variability of the cliff coast erosion of the Wolin Island in 2012–2020 in three time periods (2012–2015, 2015–2018, 2018–2020). The research used data from airborne laser scanning (ALS), based on which DEM models were made. Based on the differences between the models, the amount of sediment that was eroded by the sea waves was determined. The conducted research showed that, in the analyzed period, the dynamics of the Wolin cliffs were characterized by high variability. The greatest erosion was observed on sandy cliffs, and the smallest on clay cliffs and on cliffs that are densely covered with vegetation. In the sediment budget studies, two seashore erosivity indicators were proposed: length-normalized sediment budget (LB) (m3/m) and area-normalized sediment budget (AB) (m3/m2). The average annual dynamics of the cliff edge erosion on the Wolin Island was found to be LB = 6.6 ± 0.3 m3/m/a, AB = 0.17 ± 0.01 m3/m2/a. The results obtained are comparable with other postglacial cliffs. The use of the differential analysis of DEM models allows for the determination of the dynamics of the cliff coast and may be used in spatial development and planning of seashore protection zones. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Remote Sensing Observation on Coastal Change)
Article
On the Potential for Remote Observations of Coastal Morphodynamics from Surf-Cameras
Remote Sens. 2022, 14(7), 1706; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs14071706 - 01 Apr 2022
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Abstract
Recreational surf-cameras (surfcams) are ubiquitous along many coastlines, and yet are a largely untapped source of coastal morphodynamic observations. Surfcams offer broad spatial coverage and flexibility in data collection, but a method to remotely acquire ground control points (GCPs) and initial camera parameter [...] Read more.
Recreational surf-cameras (surfcams) are ubiquitous along many coastlines, and yet are a largely untapped source of coastal morphodynamic observations. Surfcams offer broad spatial coverage and flexibility in data collection, but a method to remotely acquire ground control points (GCPs) and initial camera parameter approximations is necessary to better leverage this existing infrastructure to make quantitative measurements. This study examines the efficacy of remotely monitoring coastal morphodynamics from surfcams at two sites on the Atlantic coast of Florida, U.S.A., by leveraging freely available airborne lidar observations to acquire remote-GCPs and open-source web tools for camera parameter approximations, ignoring lens distortion. Intrinsic and extrinsic camera parameters are determined using a modified space resection procedure, wherein parameters are determined using iterative adjustment while fitting to remote-GCPs and initial camera parameter approximations derived from justified assumptions and Google Earth. This procedure is completed using the open-source Surf-Camera Remote Calibration Tool (SurfRCaT). The results indicate root mean squared horizontal reprojection errors at the two cameras of 3.43 m and 6.48 m. Only immobile hard structures such as piers, jetties, and boulders are suitable as remote-GCPs, and the spatial distribution of available points is a likely reason for the higher accuracy at one camera relative to the other. Additionally, lens distortion is not considered in this work. This is another important source of error and including it in the methodology is highlighted as a useful avenue for future work. Additional factors, such as initial camera parameter approximation accuracy, likely play a role as well. This work illustrates that, provided there is sufficient remote-GCP availability and small lens distortion, remote video monitoring of coastal areas with existing surfcams could provide a usable source of coastal morphodynamic observations. This is further explored with a shoreline change analysis from the higher-accuracy camera. It was found that only the largest (>6 m) magnitude shoreline changes exceed the observational uncertainty driven by shoreline mapping error and reprojection error, indicating that remotely calibrated surfcams can provide observations of seasonal or storm-driven signals. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Remote Sensing Observation on Coastal Change)
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Review

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Review
On the Exploitation of Remote Sensing Technologies for the Monitoring of Coastal and River Delta Regions
Remote Sens. 2022, 14(10), 2384; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs14102384 - 16 May 2022
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Abstract
Remote sensing technologies are extensively applied to prevent, monitor, and forecast hazardous risk conditions in the present-day global climate change era. This paper presents an overview of the current stage of remote sensing approaches employed to study coastal and delta river regions. The [...] Read more.
Remote sensing technologies are extensively applied to prevent, monitor, and forecast hazardous risk conditions in the present-day global climate change era. This paper presents an overview of the current stage of remote sensing approaches employed to study coastal and delta river regions. The advantages and limitations of Earth Observation technology in characterizing the effects of climate variations on coastal environments are also presented. The role of the constellations of satellite sensors for Earth Observation, collecting helpful information on the Earth’s system and its temporal changes, is emphasized. For some key technologies, the principal characteristics of the processing chains adopted to obtain from the collected raw data added-value products are summarized. Emphasis is put on studying various disaster risks that affect coastal and megacity areas, where heterogeneous and interlinked hazard conditions can severely affect the population. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Remote Sensing Observation on Coastal Change)
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