Special Issue "Geochemistry of Water and Sediment"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Water Quality and Ecosystems".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Stanislav Frančišković-Bilinski
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute for Marine and Environmental Research,Ruđer Bošković Institute, POB 180, 10002 Zagreb, Croatia
Interests: environment science; water quality; geochemistry; water sediments; heavy metal
Dr. Sanja Sakan
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Centre of Excellence in Environmental Chemistry and Engineering – ICTM, University of Belgrade, Njegoševa 12, Belgrade 11158, Serbia
Tel. + 381 11 3336 801
Interests: environmental chemistry; heavy metals; waters; sediments; soils; pollution risk assessment

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Today, water pollution is a growing problem worldwide. Increased concentrations of toxic substances, especially heavy metals, affect biodiversity and are hazardous for human health. Sediment may act as a sink for a huge number of toxic substances and should therefore be investigated in addition to water. Geochemical investigations of aquatic sediments in freshwater and marine environments are of fundamental interest for the assessment of the state of pollution of investigated water bodies and their ecosystems. The chemical composition of sediment is informative, both in investigations of mineral resources of a particular region for mining purposes, as well as in tracing contamination from different sources (sewage, industry, agriculture, abandoned and active mines, landfills, harbors, oil drilling, etc.).  

Drinking water quality is one of the major health problems worldwide, as pollution affects all sources of drinking water—groundwater, spring-, river-, and lakewater. Interaction of water and sediment is of special importance, as sediment can also release heavy metals and act as a source of pollution.

The purpose of this Special Issue is to publish original high-quality research papers, as well as review articles addressing recent advances on water and aquatic sediment research, and new methods and developments in monitoring and legislative development.

Dr. Stanislav Frančišković-Bilinski
Dr. Sanja Sakan
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • water and sediment quality
  • geochemical composition
  • heavy metals
  • pollution
  • drinkng water
  • analytical methods
  • monitoring
  • legislative development

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Source and Mobilization Mechanism of Iron, Manganese and Arsenic in Groundwater of Shuangliao City, Northeast China
Water 2020, 12(2), 534; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12020534 (registering DOI) - 14 Feb 2020
Abstract
Excessive levels of Fe, Mn and As are the main factors affecting groundwater quality in Songliao plain, northeast China. However, there are few studies on the source and mobilization mechanisms of Fe, Mn and As in the groundwater of Northeastern China. This study [...] Read more.
Excessive levels of Fe, Mn and As are the main factors affecting groundwater quality in Songliao plain, northeast China. However, there are few studies on the source and mobilization mechanisms of Fe, Mn and As in the groundwater of Northeastern China. This study takes Shuangliao city in the middle of Songliao plain as an example, where the source and mobilization mechanisms of iron, manganese and arsenic in groundwater in the study area were analyzed by statistical methods and spatial analysis. The results show that the source of Fe and Mn in the groundwater of the platform is the iron and manganese nodules in the clay layer, while, in the river valley plain, it originates from the soil and the whole aquifer. The TDS, fluctuation in groundwater levels and the residence time are the important factors affecting the content of Fe and Mn in groundwater. The dissolution of iron and manganese minerals causes arsenic adsorbed on them to be released into groundwater. This study provides a basis for the rational utilization of groundwater and protection of people’s health in areas with high iron, manganese and arsenic contents. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geochemistry of Water and Sediment)
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Open AccessArticle
Spatiotemporal Variations in Seston C:N:P Stoichiometry in a Large Eutrophic Floodplain Lake (Lake Taihu): Do the Sources of Seston Explain Stoichiometric Flexibility?
Water 2020, 12(1), 36; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12010036 - 20 Dec 2019
Abstract
Although sources of seston are much more complicated in lakes compared to oceans, the influences of different sources on the spatiotemporal variations in seston stoichiometry are still underexplored, especially in large eutrophic floodplain lakes. Here, we investigated seston stoichiometric ratios across a typical [...] Read more.
Although sources of seston are much more complicated in lakes compared to oceans, the influences of different sources on the spatiotemporal variations in seston stoichiometry are still underexplored, especially in large eutrophic floodplain lakes. Here, we investigated seston stoichiometric ratios across a typical large eutrophic floodplain lake (Lake Taihu, East China) over one year. In addition, we used the n-alkane proxies to examine the influence of the seston source on seston stoichiometry variation. Throughout the study, the average value of the C:N:P ratio of 143:19:1 across Lake Taihu was close to the canonical lake’s ratios (166:20:1). Similar to other eutrophic lakes, seston C:N ratios varied the least across all environments, but C:P and N:P ratios varied widely and showed a strong decreasing trend in ratios of N:P and C:P from growing season to senescence season. This seasonal change was mainly associated with the decreasing contribution from algal-derived materials in seston pools because the non-algal dominated seston exhibited significantly lower ratios than algal-dominated seston. Furthermore, the spatial heterogeneity of stoichiometric ratios was also related to the seston source. During the senescence season, the terrestrial-dominated seston from agricultural watershed exhibited the lowest ratios in estuary sites compared with other areas. Statistically, the predictive power of environmental variables on stoichiometric ratios was strongly improved by adding n-alkanes proxies. Apart from source indicators, particulate phosphorus (PP) contents also partly explained the spatiotemporal variations in stoichiometric ratios. This study, thus, highlights the utility of multiple-combined n-alkane proxies in addition to simple C:N ratios to get more robust source information, which is essential for interpreting the spatiotemporal variations in seston stoichiometric ratios among eutrophic floodplain lakes and other freshwater ecosystems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geochemistry of Water and Sediment)
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Open AccessArticle
Hydrochemistry and Its Controlling Factors of Rivers in the Source Region of the Nujiang River on the Tibetan Plateau
Water 2019, 11(10), 2166; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11102166 - 17 Oct 2019
Abstract
The chemical composition of river water collected from the main stream of the Naqu and its tributaries was analyzed to reveal its hydrochemical characteristics and to evaluate the water quality for irrigation purposes. Based on 39 samples, the results revealed mildly alkaline pH [...] Read more.
The chemical composition of river water collected from the main stream of the Naqu and its tributaries was analyzed to reveal its hydrochemical characteristics and to evaluate the water quality for irrigation purposes. Based on 39 samples, the results revealed mildly alkaline pH values and total dissolved solids (TDS) values ranging from 115 to 676 mg/L, averaging 271 mg/L. Major ion concentrations based on mean values (mg/L) were in the order of Ca 2 + > Na + > Mg 2 + > K + for cations and HCO 3 > SO 4 2 > Cl > CO 3 2 for anions. Most hydrochemical types were of the Ca–HCO3 (~74.36%) type. Cluster analysis (CA) suggested that the hydrochemical characteristics upstream of the main stream of the Naqu were obviously different from those from the middle and downstream of the main stream and its tributaries. The analysis shows that the Sangqu, Basuoqu, Mumuqu, Zongqingqu, Mugequ basin tributary, and the Gongqu basin tributary were mainly affected by carbonate weathering. Carbonate and silicate weathering commonly controlled the hydrochemistry upstream and downstream of the main Naqu, Chengqu, and Mugequ streams. The middle of the main stream of the Naqu was mainly affected by silicate weathering, and anhydrite/gypsum dissolution mainly affected the hydrochemistry of the main Gongqu stream. The quality of water samples was suitable for irrigation purposes, except for one sample from the main stream of the Mugequ. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geochemistry of Water and Sediment)
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