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Special Issue "Flood Risk Analysis and Management from a System's Approach"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Hydrology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 October 2019.

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Karin De Bruijn

Deltares, Department of flood risk management, Boussinesqweg 1, 2629 HV Delft, The Netherlands
Website | E-Mail
Interests: flood risk management; resilience; flood risk analysis
Guest Editor
Dr. Kai Schröter

GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, Section 5.4 Hydrology, 14473 Potsdam, Germany
Website | E-Mail
Interests: flood risk; flood damage modelling; flood forecasting and warning; hydrological and hydraulic modelling; uncertainty analysis and optimization methods
Guest Editor
Dr. Alessio Domeneghetti

DICAM, University of Bologna, 40136 Bologna, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: flood damage and flood risk assessment; hydrological and hydraulic modelling; remote sensing; altimetry data; river bathymetry

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Improved methods and new insights in many aspects of flood risk analysis and management have become available in recent decades. To further improve flood risk management, however, it is crucial to not only focus on improvements of specific elements but to consider them in a coherent way. Methods are needed that better account for the interaction between areas, between elements from the flood risk chain, and between the physical and societal systems. We welcome papers that contribute to flood risk analysis techniques that provide insight into the flood risk of larger river systems, coastal systems, or larger areas with multiple waterways and take into account interdependencies through weather, space, and time. We think of papers that study exceedance probabilities of certain damages in areas with multiple waterways, challenges in getting consistent river flows in areas with multiple tributaries, river-dike-floodplain interactions, and long-term interactions between physical and societal systems. Also, the development of strategies for systems, taking into account system-criteria such as equity, regret, and sustainability, are welcome.

Dr. Karin de Bruijn
Dr. Kai Schröter
Dr. Alessio Domeneghetti
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Flood risk analysis
  • Flood risk management
  • Systems approach
  • Hydrodynamic interaction
  • Interdependencies
  • Correlations
  • System trade-offs

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Large Scale Flood Hazard Analysis by Including Defence Failures on the Dutch River System
Water 2019, 11(8), 1732; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11081732 (registering DOI)
Received: 24 July 2019 / Revised: 9 August 2019 / Accepted: 15 August 2019 / Published: 20 August 2019
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Abstract
To make informed flood risk management (FRM) decisions in large protected river systems, flood risk and hazard analyses should include the potential for dike breaching. ‘Load interdependency’ analyses attempt to include the system-wide effects of dike breaching while accounting for the uncertainty of [...] Read more.
To make informed flood risk management (FRM) decisions in large protected river systems, flood risk and hazard analyses should include the potential for dike breaching. ‘Load interdependency’ analyses attempt to include the system-wide effects of dike breaching while accounting for the uncertainty of both river loads and dike fragility. The intensive stochastic computation required for these analyses often precludes the use of complex hydraulic models, but simpler models may miss spatial inundation interactions such as flows that ‘cascade’ between compartmentalised regions and overland flows that ‘shortcut’ between river branches. The potential for these interactions in the Netherlands has previously been identified, and so a schematisation of the Dutch floodplain and protection system is here developed for use in a load interdependency analysis. The approach allows for the spatial distribution of hazard to be quantified under various scenarios and return periods. The results demonstrate the importance of including spatial inundation interactions on hazard estimation at three specific locations, and for the system in general. The general modelling approach can be used at a local scale to focus flood-risk analysis and management on the relevant causes of inundation, and at a system-wide scale to estimate the overall impact of large-scale measures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Flood Risk Analysis and Management from a System's Approach)
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Open AccessArticle
Flood Risk Analysis of Different Climatic Phenomena during Flood Season Based on Copula-Based Bayesian Network Method: A Case Study of Taihu Basin, China
Water 2019, 11(8), 1534; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11081534
Received: 19 June 2019 / Revised: 16 July 2019 / Accepted: 23 July 2019 / Published: 24 July 2019
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Abstract
We propose a flood risk management model for the Taihu Basin, China, that considers the spatial and temporal differences of flood risk caused by the different climatic phenomena. In terms of time, the probability distribution of climatic phenomenon occurrence time was used to [...] Read more.
We propose a flood risk management model for the Taihu Basin, China, that considers the spatial and temporal differences of flood risk caused by the different climatic phenomena. In terms of time, the probability distribution of climatic phenomenon occurrence time was used to divide the flood season into plum rain and the typhoon periods. In terms of space, the Taihu Basin was divided into different sub-regions by the Copula functions. Finally, we constructed a flood risk management model using the Copula-based Bayesian network to analyze the flood risk. The results showed the plum rain period occurs from June 24 to July 21 and the typhoon period from July 22 to September 22. Considering the joint distribution of sub-region precipitation and the water level of Taihu Lake, we divided the Taihu Basin into three sub-regions (P-I, P-II, and P-III) for risk analysis in the plum rain period. However, the Taihu Basin was used as a whole for flood risk analysis in the typhoon period. Risk analysis indicated a probability of 2.4%, and 0.8%, respectively, for future adverse drainage during the plum rain period and the typhoon period, the flood risk increases rapidly with the rising water level in the Taihu Lake. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Flood Risk Analysis and Management from a System's Approach)
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Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
Effect of Density and Total Weight on Flow Depth, Velocity, and Stresses in Loess Debris Flows
Water 2018, 10(12), 1784; https://doi.org/10.3390/w10121784
Received: 5 November 2018 / Revised: 18 November 2018 / Accepted: 3 December 2018 / Published: 5 December 2018
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Abstract
Debris flows that involve loess material produce important damage around the world. However, the kinematics of such processes are poorly understood. To better understand these kinematics, we used a flume to measure the kinematics of debris flows with different mixture densities and weights. [...] Read more.
Debris flows that involve loess material produce important damage around the world. However, the kinematics of such processes are poorly understood. To better understand these kinematics, we used a flume to measure the kinematics of debris flows with different mixture densities and weights. We used sensors to measure pore fluid pressure and total normal stress. We measured flow patterns, velocities, and depths using a high-speed camera and laser range finder to identify the temporal evolution of the flow behavior and the corresponding peaks. We constructed fitting functions for the relationships between the maximum values of the experimental parameters. The hydrographs of the debris flows could be divided into four phases: increase to a first minor peak, a subsequent smooth increase to a second peak, fluctuation until a third major peak, and a final continuous decrease. The flow depth, velocity, total normal stress, and pore fluid pressure were strongly related to the mixture density and total mixture weight. We defined the corresponding relationships between the flow parameters and mixture kinematics. Linear and exponential relationships described the maximum flow depth and the mixture weight and density, respectively. The flow velocity was linearly related to the weight and density. The pore fluid pressure and total normal stress were linearly related to the weight, but logarithmically related to the density. The regression goodness of fit for all functions was >0.93. Therefore, these functions are accurate and could be used to predict the consequences of loess debris flows. Our results provide an improved understanding of the effects of mixture density and weight on the kinematics of debris flows in loess areas, and can help landscape managers prevent and design improved engineering solutions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Flood Risk Analysis and Management from a System's Approach)
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