Special Issue "Environmental Fate of Contaminants in the Aquatic Environment"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Aquatic Systems—Quality and Contamination".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 November 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Anna Barra Caracciolo
Website
Guest Editor
National Research Council, Water Research Institute (IRSA-CNR), Rome, Italy
Interests: environmental fate and effects of xenobiotics; water and soil ecology; microbial ecology; biodegradation; bioremediation; ecotoxicology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Freshwater aquatic ecosystems are a small fraction of the overall water on the planet, and for this reason they are a precious resource for both terrestrial and aquatic organisms. However, these water ecosystems are chronically subjected to a multiple contamination by various point and diffuse industrial, urban, and agricultural sources. A cocktail of regulated hazardous chemicals (e.g., pesticides, hydrocarbons, heavy metals, surfactants), commercial products, and emerging contaminants (e.g., nanoparticles, pharmaceuticals, personal care products, micro(nano)plastics) reach freshwater and can have detrimental effects on the structure and functioning of ecosystems and human health.

This Special Issue welcomes research papers dealing with chemical, microbiological, ecological, and ecotoxicological approaches for assessing the presence of regulated and emerging contaminants and their effects from their sources (e.g., urban- and agro-ecosystems, industrial sites, landfills) to water ecosystems.

Dr. Anna Barra Caracciolo
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • water and soil contaminants
  • persistence and pseudo-persistence
  • chemical mixture
  • effects
  • community structure and functioning
  • biodegradation
  • bioremediation

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Environmental Fate and Effects of Foaming Agents Containing Sodium Lauryl Ether Sulphate in Soil Debris from Mechanized Tunneling
Water 2020, 12(8), 2074; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12082074 - 22 Jul 2020
Abstract
A wide use of foaming agents as lubricants is required in mechanized tunneling. Their main component, the anionic surfactant sodium lauryl ether sulphate (SLES), can remain in residual concentrations in soil debris, influencing their potential reuse as by-product. This study aimed at evaluating [...] Read more.
A wide use of foaming agents as lubricants is required in mechanized tunneling. Their main component, the anionic surfactant sodium lauryl ether sulphate (SLES), can remain in residual concentrations in soil debris, influencing their potential reuse as by-product. This study aimed at evaluating the environmental fate and effects of a foaming product used for conditioning soils collected from real excavation sites, in the presence/absence of an anti-clogging polymer, both containing SLES. Soil microcosm experiments were set-up and incubated for 28 days. Over time, soils and their water extracts (elutriates) were collected to perform both ecotoxicological tests (Vibrio fischeri, Lepidium sativum, Eisenia foetida, Hetereocypris incongruens, Danio rerio) and SLES analysis. The results showed that, just after conditioning, SLES did not exert any hazardous effect on the organisms tested except for the bacterium V. fischeri, which was the most sensitive to its presence. However, from day seven the toxic effect on the bacterium was never observed thanks to the SLES decrease in the elutriates (<2 mg/L). SLES degraded in soils (half-lives from 9 to 25 days) with higher disappearance rates corresponding to higher values of microbial abundances. This study highlights the importance of site-specific studies for assessing the environmental reuse of spoil materials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environmental Fate of Contaminants in the Aquatic Environment)
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Open AccessArticle
Trophic Magnification of Legacy (PCB, DDT and Hg) and Emerging Pollutants (PFAS) in the Fish Community of a Small Protected Southern Alpine Lake (Lake Mergozzo, Northern Italy)
Water 2020, 12(6), 1591; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12061591 - 03 Jun 2020
Abstract
The biomagnification of mercury, polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane and its metabolites (DDTs) and perfluoroalkyl acids substances (PFASs) was evaluated in the trophic web of Lake Mergozzo, a small and deep Italian subalpine lake, which has been chosen because it is a protected environment, and [...] Read more.
The biomagnification of mercury, polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane and its metabolites (DDTs) and perfluoroalkyl acids substances (PFASs) was evaluated in the trophic web of Lake Mergozzo, a small and deep Italian subalpine lake, which has been chosen because it is a protected environment, and discharges into the lake are mostly avoided. Carbon source and relative trophic levels were calculated by using 13C and 15N stable isotopes, respectively, and trophic magnification factors (TMFs) were derived. Zooplankton and thirteen species of fish were collected and analyzed, and the results showed the elevated level of biota contamination from both legacy and emerging pollutants, even if direct discharges were avoided. Concentrations in biota, expressed as sums of compounds, ranged from 0.4 to 60 µg kg−1 wet weight (ww) for PFASs, from 16 to 1.3 104 µg kg−1 lipid content (lw) for DDTs, from 17 to 1.5 104 µg kg−1 lw for PCBs and from 20.0 to 501 µg kg−1 ww for mercury (Hg). TMFs of this deep, cold lake, with a prevalent pelagic trophic chain, were high and clearly indicated fish biomagnification, except for PFAS. The biomagnification capability of PFAS in a fish-only food web was discussed by using the biomagnification of Hg as a benchmark for assessing their bioaccumulation potential. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environmental Fate of Contaminants in the Aquatic Environment)
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Open AccessArticle
Multivariate Statistical Analysis of Hydrochemical Data and Stable Isotopes of Groundwater Contaminated with Nitrate at Huay Sai Royal Development Study Center and Adjacent Areas in Phetchaburi Province, Thailand
Water 2020, 12(4), 1127; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12041127 - 15 Apr 2020
Abstract
Due to the continuous expansion in agriculture production and industry for many years, groundwater usage has been increasing, with a decrease in groundwater levels in many cases. In addition, in some areas, groundwater quality has degraded due to agrochemical contamination from agricultural areas. [...] Read more.
Due to the continuous expansion in agriculture production and industry for many years, groundwater usage has been increasing, with a decrease in groundwater levels in many cases. In addition, in some areas, groundwater quality has degraded due to agrochemical contamination from agricultural areas. The aims of this research pertains to aquifers as follows: (1) to evaluate hydrochemical characteristics of groundwater using multivariate statistical analysis, including principal component analysis (PCA) and hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA), and (2) to integrate the stable isotopes 18O and 2H with hydrochemical data to evaluate the origin of the groundwater and indirectly identify the pollution sources of groundwater contaminated with nitrate (NO3). Water samples were collected from 60 groundwater wells with different hydrogeological characteristics and land use types in both the rainy season (in October) and the summer seasons (in February) in the Cha Am district of Phetchaburi Province. The groundwater was separated into 3 types: Ca-Na-Cl, Ca-Na-HCO3-Cl, and Na-Cl. Two groundwater wells (no. 19 and 41), which were located southeast and southwest of the study area, had relatively high NO3 concentrations (47 mg/L NO3 and 50 mg/L NO3, respectively) that were higher than the groundwater quality standards. These two wells corresponded to the second group that was exposed by HCA. The PCA results revealed the influence of seawater intrusion. Furthermore, multivariate statistical analysis (PC 2) revealed that the NO3 that is mainly released from potassium nitrate (KNO3), for example, during pineapple cultivation, directly contaminated the groundwater system. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environmental Fate of Contaminants in the Aquatic Environment)
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Open AccessArticle
Combined Effects of Compost and Medicago Sativa in Recovery a PCB Contaminated Soil
Water 2020, 12(3), 860; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12030860 - 19 Mar 2020
Abstract
The effectiveness of adding compost and the plant Medicago sativa in improving the quality of a soil historically contaminated by polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) was tested in greenhouse microcosms. Plant pots, containing soil samples from an area contaminated by PCBs, were treated with the [...] Read more.
The effectiveness of adding compost and the plant Medicago sativa in improving the quality of a soil historically contaminated by polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) was tested in greenhouse microcosms. Plant pots, containing soil samples from an area contaminated by PCBs, were treated with the compost and the plant, separately or together. Moreover, un-treated and un-planted microcosms were used as controls. At fixed times (1, 133 and 224 days), PCBs were analysed and the structure (cell abundance, phylogenetic characterization) and functioning (cell viability, dehydrogenase activity) of the natural microbial community were also measured. The results showed the effectiveness of the compost and plant in increasing the microbial activity, cell viability, and bacteria/fungi ratio, and in decreasing the amount of higher-chlorinated PCBs. Moreover, a higher number of α-Proteobacteria, one of the main bacterial groups involved in the degradation of PCBs, was found in the compost and plant co-presence. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environmental Fate of Contaminants in the Aquatic Environment)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.


[1] Selective potential of the sulfamethoxazole antibiotic on the spread of resistant genes in natural microbial communities.

Rauseo, W.H. Gaze, N. Ademollo, F. Spataro, T. Pescatore, I.C. Stanton, A. Barra Caracciolo, P. Grenni, L. Patrolecco

[2] Mesocosm experiments to assess ecotoxicity of excavated material from mechanized tunnelling.

Grenni P, Barra Caracciolo A, Rauseo J, Di Lenola, Mingazzini M, Palumbo MT, Galli E, Muzzini V, Donati E, Lacchetti I, Gucci P, Finizio A, Fumagalli P, Patrolecco L

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